SLO | EN
PRD-v18

1

Academic bachelor's studies

1 (prva)

7 (7)

0028175

6/2

2024/25

doc. dr. DANIJELA LAHE, univ. dipl. soc.

SOCIOLOGY AND INTERDISCIPLINARY STUDIES

dipl. soc. in interdisc. druž. (UN)
diplomant sociologije in interdisciplinarnega družboslovja (UN)
diplomantka sociologije in interdisciplinarnega družboslovja (UN)
B.A.
Bachelor of Arts

03 - Social sciences, journalism and information
0314 - Sociology and cultural studies

5 - Social Sciences

Text about acceptance

On the basis of Article 51 of the Law on higher education (Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 119/06-UPB3) and the Measures for the accreditation of higher education institutions and study programmes (Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, no. 101/04) the Senate for accreditation with the Council of Higher Education of the Republic of Slovenia at its 4th meeting on 16th November 2007, adopted or gave consent to the university BA single-major study programme Sociology and Interdisciplinary Social Studies (Decree No. 2/81-2007 dated 20th November 2007).

Advancement criteria of a study programme

In order to progress to the second year, students must complete at least 55 ECTS credits. In order to progress to the third year, students must complete all first-year course units and second-year course units prescribed by the programme totalling at least 55 ECTS credits.

Criteria for completing separate parts of a study programme

The programme does not contain individual segments.

Study advancement options

The study programme simultaneously prepares students for further study in second-cycle programmes (e.g. the single-subject programme in Sociology or the two-subject teacher education programme in Sociology) or related programmes.

Employment possibilities

The single-subject pathway in Sociology and Interdisciplinary Social Sciences gives graduates the opportunity to acquire specific professional competences in understanding modern societies and the processes that shape them. Specifically, by including content from the fields of economics, statistics, anthropology, ethnology, history and research methodology, the pathway allows a high degree of flexibility, in that it strengthens interdisciplinarity, while at the same time its research orientation helps students understand and address the challenges facing modern society. Moreover, thanks to content that contributes to the development of communication skills, scholarly enquiry and research methodology, critical thinking and the ability to understand complex problems, the pathway is directly focused on the future needs of the labour market. According to a recent report from Eurostat, 55% of Europe’s active workforce lacks the basic skills needed to understand and resolve complex problems: skills which are not only increasingly sought-after but which are also relatively immune to automation. This is important in view of the fact that of the 32 OECD member states, Slovenia has the second highest share of jobs that could become completely automated (an OECD report clearly highlights that the jobs that are least “at risk” are those that require “soft skills”, in other words those skills that, as pointed out above, are strengthened and developed by the programme). Just how important programmes that develop verbal and non-verbal communication skills, storytelling and holistic and critical thinking are for the labour market of the future is clearly demonstrated by, for example, the report “Qualified for the Future: Quantifying demand for arts, humanities and social science skills”, published in February 2021 by the British Academy. Among other things, this report states that those who study, arts, humanities and social science subjects are increasingly frequently (in comparison with STEM graduates) ending up in jobs within the fastest-growing sectors of the economy. This is partly because they are more flexible and adaptable, thanks to their ability to take a holistic view of individual challenges. Consequently, employment opportunities for graduates of the single-subject pathway in Sociology and Interdisciplinary Social Sciences relate to all areas of economic and non-economic activity, but in particular to the fields of local/public administration, politics, culture and media, where they can pursue occupations such as researcher, analyst, operations organiser, journalist, systems analyst, personnel officer, marketing officer, sales representative, teacher of social science subjects, and so on. We should point out that exact figures on employment in the economic and non-economic sectors are not available to us, in part because UM is still in the process of setting up a system for the regular and systematic monitoring of employability and in part because the Act amending the Labour Market Regulation Act (ZUTD-A), which entered into force on 12 April 2013, did away with the obligation to report job vacancies to the Employment Service of Slovenia (ESS). In the case of employers who do not belong to the public sector and companies that are not majority-owned by the state, the publication of job vacancies is left to their discretion and they are not required to inform the ESS. As a result, the ESS no longer has information on all job vacancies in the country.

Other obligations

Pathway: Sociology and Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (single-subject pathway): Vertical integration: All units in the first and second semesters are core units. During the third and fourth semesters, there is a vertical enrichment in the sense of special sociologies (economic sociology, sociology of the family, political sociology, sociology of religion, social gerontology) accompanied by a broadening of methodological skills, social anthropology and ethics. The contents of Methodology II complement the knowledge acquired in Methodology I, which builds on the Statistics for Social Scientists. Similarly, the contents of Economic Sociology complement the knowledge acquired within Introduction to Economics. Vertical enhancement continues in the units of the fifth and sixth semesters. Social Anthropology I is complemented by Social Anthropology II, Sociology of Gender is complemented by Sociology of Sexuality and Sociology of Economic Systems and Development is complemented by Economic Sociology. Some elective units, which allow students the freedom to explore areas that interest them in greater depth, also follow a vertical logic. Thus, for example, Introduction to Youth Work is vertically complemented by Youth Studies, Comparative Religious Studies is vertically complemented by Sociology of Religion, and From Objects To Symbols is vertically complemented by Ethnology of Everyday Life. Within the unit Sociology in Practice, students complement their previously acquired theoretical knowledge with practical experience in a working environment. Elective foreign language units (Foreign Language I, Foreign Language II, Foreign Language III) are also vertically integrated. The programme also allows vertical integration with other programmes at the Faculty (e.g. Psychology and Philosophy) and, above all, enables direct vertical enhancement in a master’s degree programme. Horizontal integration: Units that complement each other are taught in a single semester. Knowledge acquired through the units of an individual semester forms the basis for successful work in the units in the semesters that follow. The study programme is designed in such a way that individual units or groups of units are mutually horizontally integrated in the following manner: • in the first year, students take the core units of the programme, which include the basics of sociological disciplines and methodology, while also acquiring fundamental knowledge in supporting, non-sociological disciplines (economics, ethics, anthropology, ethnology, social psychology); • in the second year, students broaden their fundamental knowledge and enhance it with special sociologies, while also developing their methodological and statistical skills and broadening their knowledge via an elective unit; • in the third year, students learn about the dynamic nature of modern society and further expand their areas of specialist knowledge through elective units. Thanks to its broad design, the programme has excellent horizontal integration with other programmes offered at the Faculty (e.g. Psychology and Philosophy).

Assesment criteria

Criteria and methods for testing and assessing student outcomes are made publicly available and are implemented in accordance with the adopted learning programme, unit syllabuses and information on the unit. The assessment system is regulated in accordance with the Statutes of the University of Maribor and the Rules on testing and assessing knowledge at the University of Maribor. Both documents are available online at: https://www.um.si/o-univerzi/dokumentno-sredisce/. Learning outcomes are defined by syllabuses. These are made publicly available and are accessible to all. They can be found in the catalogue of post-Bologna Reform programmes and units (https://aips.um.si/PredmetiBP5/main.asp) and on the Faculty of Arts website (http://ff.um.si/studenti/studijski-programi/). The method of assessment and testing is defined in each syllabus. This means that, on the basis of the published syllabus content, students can compare or check the content and levels of knowledge associated with specific skills. Academic staff encourage continuous work and continuous testing of knowledge throughout the study process, in this way enabling students to maintain a constant overview of their own progress. Students are also verbally informed about assessment criteria and methods when they begin a unit. Following analyses of pedagogical work and evaluation of the programme, appropriate amendments are made to syllabuses. Verification of whether students are successfully meeting the requirements of the programme is done through the testing and assessment of knowledge, which is the basis on which students obtain marks and credits in individual units of the programme, allowing them to progress through the programme and move on to further studies. At the same time, it provides students with feedback on the level of knowledge they have attained. Exam results are entered in an electronic register called the Academic Information Subsystem (AIPS). Results are entered by the exam administrator, who has access to the details of the students entered for the exam. After entering the marks for an individual exam, the exam administrator submits a signed exam report to the Student Affairs Office. This report is kept permanently and represents an official record of the institution. Students are informed of exam results as soon as they are entered and confirmed by the exam administrator, via their personal AIPS account, which they access using a username and password. Students have the right to ask to see their marked exam papers within 30 days of publication of the results. Students’ knowledge is tested in examinations, colloquia and other forms of testing and assessment, and awarded a positive or negative mark. Positive marks are “excellent” (10), “very good” (9 and 8), “good” (7) and “satisfactory” (6). Negative marks are all marks from 1 to 5. Units may also be assessed as “passed”/“not passed” if the syllabus envisages this. The University of Maribor uses a uniform marking scale, which can be consulted online at: https://moja.um.si/student/Strani/Pravilniki-in-predpisi.aspx. Examination timetables are published in the publicly accessible calendar for each individual academic year (http://ff.um.si/studenti/urniki/). Lists of scheduled exam dates for individual units throughout the academic year are prepared by Departments and published by the Student Affairs Office in the AIPS by no later than 15 November for the current academic year.

Main study programme objectives

The primary aim of the first-cycle study programme in Sociology is to introduce students to professional work and research in the fields covered by sociological science and to provide them with the knowledge that is required in a services-based economy, in this way facilitating access to the labour market. On completion of the first cycle, students on both pathways will have acquired knowledge and analytical and social skills in the basic and applied disciplines of sociological science and certain other sciences related to sociology. These skills and knowledge are the basis for further education and specialisation in various forms of postgraduate study and professional development in sociology (and similar study programmes) while at the same time they are useful for jobs in which: (a) research methodology skills are used to address the majority of problems; (b) basic computer skills are needed; (c) academic and professional literature is subjected to critical interpretation; (d) statistical approaches are used in the preparation and performance of empirical research and practical work; (e) independent learning skills are used; (f) work tasks in various fields of activity (public administration, business enterprise sector, journalism, social welfare, etc.) are planned and organised autonomously. The study programme provides a suitable and well-rounded range of knowledge and skills that enable graduates to participate successfully in the labour market and at the same time provides them with the motivation and ability to continue their studies at the postgraduate (second-cycle) level, whether in sociology or in other social science programmes, either at UM or at other higher education institution in Slovenia or elsewhere. Graduates of the single-subject pathway in Sociology and Interdisciplinary Social Sciences acquire in-depth knowledge of sociology and anthropology (and, to some extent, ethnology, psychology, ethics and economics) and the methodology of social science research. The competences they develop in this context include, in particular, in-depth and critical understanding of methodological approaches and starting points, the ability to find and use new sources of knowledge, the ability to develop and enhance communication skills and other professional competences necessary for field-specific and interdisciplinary professional work on a lifelong basis, the ability to develop professional critical thinking and self-criticism, responsibility, initiative and independence in professional work and social activities. Graduates are also able to understand and critically evaluate sociological material in a foreign language (English) and can read, understand and critically evaluate sociological content in English and use the correct English technical terminology, including when writing texts. The aims of the single-subject pathway derive from the nature of the social sciences themselves and are focused on interdisciplinarity and applicability.

General competences of graduates, gained at a study programme

The general competences developed by the study programme have been formulated on the basis of the wealth of experience gained from implementation of the educational process to date, while certain necessary modifications have been introduced following a thorough study of the current situation. General competences make up the general profile of the graduate. Competence development within the study process does not only involve the development of knowledge but also the student’s attitude to the application of this knowledge. This is an educative component that is inextricably linked to the educational component. Over the course of the first cycle, students acquire an essential range of universal knowledge of this kind, along with core knowledge about the unit or programme. In this sense, students develop understanding and the ability to apply knowledge to a point where they are able to demonstrate a professional and ethically correct approach to addressing professional problems, formulate proposals and positions when addressing professional problems within their professional field and support them with arguments, while remaining open to other arguments and new proposals. They also develop the learning skills that are needed for effective study at the university level and, at the same time, form a basis for further learning with a high degree of independence. The general competences acquired by students include: • knowledge and understanding of the history of the central discipline (sociology); • well-developed general and programme-specific (i.e. social science related) literacy (the ability to evaluate and generate social science discourses); • a well-developed ability to independently accumulate and apply knowledge and knowledge resources/sources; • a well-developed ability to observe, analyse, synthesise and critically appraise; • a well-developed capacity for self-criticism and the ability to oversee their own professional development; • a well-developed ability to work individually and as part of a team; • a well-developed ability to organise their own time and activities; • general competence in the use of information technology; • a well-developed ability to express, represent and argue a position through dialogue, with an emphasis on the progressive resolution of conflicts; • learning competence and a positive attitude towards lifelong learning; • the ability to resolve specific work problems through the application of scientific methods; • the ability to communicate and speak in public; • the ability to act in accordance with professional ethics; • well-developed sociological and intellectual curiosity; • the ability to resolve conflicts, communicate constructively and cooperate with others.

Subject specific competences of graduates, gained on a study programme

• familiarity with sociological concepts, the basic areas of sociological thematisation and the fundamental conceptual divisions of the sociological field • an understanding of the causes of individual social phenomena and the ability to explain them and predict changes and development in the future • a good grasp of fundamental sociological theories and the ability to use these theories to address various social phenomena • a well-developed capacity for intradisciplinary, interdisciplinary and transdisciplinary thinking • familiarity with basic statistical analyses in the social sciences and the use of various methods of data analysis to carry out independent statistical analyses and elementary research • the ability to methodically analyse the life of society, carry out quantitative analyses of social phenomena and critically evaluate data and sources • the ability to autonomously produce academic or professional articles (finding sources, planning research, evaluation, presentation and analysis of results) • familiarity with the basic methods of qualitative research and the ability to engage in participant observation as one of the key methods of anthropological research • the ability to identify the principal contemporary ethical dilemmas and problems and connect philosophical and sociological thought • familiarity with the fundamental concepts and approaches of social psychology and an understanding of their importance for other social sciences • familiarity with and understanding of the chronology, social characteristics and spatial conditions of everyday life in Slovenia and the ability to treat individual phenomena in everyday life from an ethnological perspective • the ability to evaluate the characteristics and specificities of Slovenian society from an intercultural and international perspective, with an emphasis on understanding the dialectical nature of the processes that shape Slovenian society • an understanding of political activity and the characteristics of political life in current conditions in the European Union and Slovenia • the ability to read, understand and critically evaluate sociological material in English and to use the correct English technical terminology, including when writing texts. • assimilation of fundamental economic knowledge and theories and an understanding of economic categories from various sociological perspectives • the ability to describe and interpret various views of economic systems and development • familiarity with the characteristics of the concepts of family and parenthood and an understanding of individual forms of family and family roles from different historical and cultural perspectives • familiarity with sociological and anthropological views and theories of childhood and the ability to view the topic of children and childhood from an intercultural perspective • an understanding of the phenomenon of youth, a well-developed capacity to study youth in different cultural, historical and ideological contexts and an ability to evaluate the factors that construct the social reality of young people • familiarity with the basic concepts, approaches and study methods of social anthropology and an understanding of culture and the relationship between the individual and culture on the basis of socialisation as a fundamental social process • familiarity with non-European societies and a well-developed ability to carry out comparative analysis of different societies and cultures • an understanding of the functioning and importance of the media from various social, historical, cultural and political perspectives and the ability to view the relationship between society and the media with a critical eye • familiarity with and understanding of the concept of ageing in its various sociological interpretations and the ability to analyse the role of the elderly in various life circumstances • familiarity with the key social science and sociological views of globalisation and modernisation and an understanding of the diversity of views of social changes and their determinism • familiarity with the sociological discourse of gender, gender difference and gender identity, an understanding of sexuality as a social construct and the ability to analyse and interpret the concept of gender from historical and intercultural perspectives • familiarity with the basic concepts of religious life, the role of religion in modern society and the most important world religious traditions, and the ability to analyse the place of religion in different cultural contexts • an understanding of the theories and basic approaches to the study of the concepts of criminality and deviance and the ability to evaluate individual concepts on the basis of interdisciplinary approaches • familiarity with fundamental sociological theories in education and the ability to compare individual education systems and analyse the relationship between education, the family and inequality • familiarity with the importance of sociology in various applied environments, an understanding of the role of sociology in various organisations and the ability to apply sociological knowledge and competences in various working environments • familiarity with and understanding of the dimensions of the material civilisation of Europeans

Access requirements

The following may enrol in the first-cycle Sociology programme, Sociology and Interdisciplinary Social Sciences pathway (single-subject): 1. anyone who has passed the general matura (school-leaving examination), 2. anyone who has passed the vocational matura in any secondary school programme and an examination in one general matura subject; the selected subject may not be a subject already taken by the applicant as part of the vocational matura, 3. anyone who completed any four-year secondary school programme before 1 June 1995.

Selection criteria in the event of limited enrolment

Study programme: Sociology, pathway: Sociology and Interdisciplinary Social Sciences (single-subject pathway) If a decision is taken to limit places, applicants from points 1) and 3) will be selected on the basis of: overall mark in the general matura or school-leaving exam 60% of points, overall marks in the third and fourth years 40% of points; applicants from point 2) will be selected on the basis of: overall mark in the vocational matura 20% of points, overall marks in the third and fourth years 40% of points, mark in one matura subject 40% of points.

Transfer criteria between study programmes

Transfers between study programmes are possible in accordance with Articles 2 and 3 of the Criteria for Transfers between Study Programmes (UL RS, Nos 95/10, 17/11 and 14/19). Applicants who meet conditions for enrolment in the proposed programme and the conditions for transfer between programmes will be informed what year they may enrol in and what missing course units they must complete if they wish to conclude their studies under the new programme. Transfers are possible between programmes: - which guarantee the acquisition of comparable competences on completion and between which at least half the course units under the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) from the first study programme relating to compulsory units of the second study programme may be recognised under the criteria for recognising knowledge and skills acquired prior to enrolment in the programme.

Criteria for recognition of knowledge and skills, gained before the enrolment in the study programme

Under the Rules on the recognition of knowledge and skills in programmes of study at the University of Maribor (https://www.um.si/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Pravilnik-o-priznavanju-znanj-in-spretnosti-v-studijskih-programih-UM-st.-012-2019-2.pdf), knowledge, skills or competences acquired by a student through formal or non-formal learning before enrolling in the programme (“prior learning”) may be recognised in the education process. The fundamental criterion in the recognition process is the comparability of knowledge acquired elsewhere with the course units, skills and competences in the programme. Applications for the recognition of knowledge and skills acquired through various forms of formal and non-formal education before enrolling in the programme will be considered by the Faculty of Arts in accordance with regulations. The student submits an application for the recognition of knowledge and skills to the Academic Affairs Committee at the Faculty of Arts. Knowledge/skills can be recognised in full, recognised in part or not recognised. In cases where knowledge/skills are recognised in part, the student must sit a specific exam on content determined by the unit coordinator.

Criteria for completing the study

In the case of the single-subject pathway in Sociology and Interdisciplinary Social Sciences, students must complete all course units prescribed by the pathway, corresponding to all the credits envisaged in the pathway (180 ECTS credits).

SOCIOLOGY

dipl. soc. (UN) in …
diplomirani sociolog (UN) in …
diplomirana sociologinja (UN) in …
B.A.
Bachelor of Arts

03 - Social sciences, journalism and information
0314 - Sociology and cultural studies

5 - Social Sciences

Text about acceptance

On the basis of Article 51 of the Law on higher education (Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 119/06-UPB3) and the Measures for the accreditation of higher education institutions and study programmes (Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 101/04) the Senate for accreditation with the Council of Higher Education of the Republic of Slovenia at its 4th meeting on 16th November 2007, adopted or gave consent to the university BA double major study programme Sociology (Decree No. 2/81-2007 dated 20th November 2007).

Advancement criteria of a study programme

In order to progress to the second year, students must complete at least 25 ECTS credits and the number of ECTS credits envisaged by the other chosen programme. In order to progress to the third year, students must complete all first-year course units, second-year course units prescribed by the programme totalling at least 25 ECTS credits and the number of ECTS credits envisaged by the other chosen programme.

Criteria for completing separate parts of a study programme

The programme does not contain individual segments.

Study advancement options

The study programme prepares students for further study in second-cycle programmes (e.g. the combined (two-subject) teacher education programme in Sociology or the single-subject non-teaching programme in Sociology) or related programmes.

Employment possibilities

The two-subject pathway in Sociology gives graduates the opportunity to acquire specific professional competences in understanding modern societies and the processes that shape them. Specifically, via its links to other areas of study, the pathway allows a high degree of flexibility, in that it strengthens interdisciplinarity, while at the same time its research orientation helps students understand and address the challenges facing modern society. Moreover, thanks to content that contributes to the development of communication skills, scholarly enquiry and research methodology, critical thinking and the ability to understand complex problems, the pathway is directly focused on the future needs of the labour market. According to a recent report from Eurostat, 55% of Europe’s active workforce lacks the basic skills needed to understand and resolve complex problems: skills which are not only increasingly sought-after but which are also relatively immune to automation. This is important in view of the fact that of the 32 OECD member states, Slovenia has the second highest share of jobs that could become completely automated (an OECD report clearly highlights that the jobs that are least “at risk” are those that require “soft skills”, in other words those skills that, as pointed out above, are strengthened and developed by the programme). The importance of developing verbal and non-verbal communication skills, storytelling and holistic and critical thinking is clearly demonstrated by, for example, the report “Qualified for the Future: Quantifying demand for arts, humanities and social science skills”, published in February 2021 by the British Academy. Among other things, this report states that those who study, arts, humanities and social science subjects are increasingly frequently (in comparison with STEM graduates) ending up in jobs within the fastest-growing sectors of the economy. In part because they are more flexible and adaptable. The employment opportunities of graduates of the two-subject pathway in Sociology thus relate to all areas of economic and non-economic activity (education, advertising, tourism, culture, media, social work/care, governmental organisations and NGOs, etc., depending on the subject area of the other study programme), although we should point out that exact figures on employment in the economic and non-economic sectors are not available to us, in part because UM is still in the process of setting up a system for the regular and systematic monitoring of employability and in part because the Act amending the Labour Market Regulation Act (ZUTD-A), which entered into force on 12 April 2013, did away with the obligation to report job vacancies to the Employment Service of Slovenia (ESS). In the case of employers who do not belong to the public sector and companies that are not majority-owned by the state, the publication of job vacancies is left to their discretion and they are not required to inform the ESS. As a result, the ESS no longer has information on all job vacancies in the country. Finally, we would like to end by drawing attention to the opinion of Gerald R. Greenberg, a senior associate dean at the Syracuse University College of Arts and Sciences. Dr Greenberg believes that the penetration of the idea that education must necessarily be judged from the point of view of its effects on the labour market is harmful. He also believes that favouring STEM subjects (science, technology, engineering, mathematics) while demonising the humanities and social sciences is harmful both to society and to individuals. Both factors lead to a collective loss of creativity and narrowmindedness (which fuels radicalisation and intolerance), which together threaten social stability.

Other obligations

Vertical integration: - in the first and second years, students take the core units of the pathway, which include the basics of sociological disciplines, while also acquiring fundamental knowledge of Social Anthropology. The core units of the programme include General Sociology, Sociological Methodology and Sociological Theories. From the first year onwards, in parallel with the core sociological units, students are gradually introduced to the study of special sociological disciplines through the units Sociology of the Family, Youth Studies, Sociology of Gender, Political Sociology and Sociology of Upbringing and Education. - Some elective units, which allow students the freedom to explore areas that interest them in greater depth, also follow a vertical logic. - The programme also allows vertical integration with other programmes at the Faculty (e.g. Psychology and Philosophy) and, above all, enables direct vertical enhancement in a master’s degree programme. Horizontal integration: Comprehensive horizontal integration follows the characteristics of modern sociology, which encompasses a multitude of different views, approaches and discourses. Only when the student is familiar with the theoretical plurality of modern sociological approaches is it possible to talk about knowledge of sociology as a single science. The pathway is designed in such a way that individual units or groups of units are horizontally integrated with each other in the following way: - At the start of the programme (in the first year and, partly, in the second year), students acquire basic sociological and other (methodological, social science) knowledge and later broaden their knowledge within individual fields that are delimited as disciplines by individual special sociologies and by a suitable selection of units from within a range of elective units and/or units from other fields and professional areas. Mutual connections within an individual year could, for example, include the following complementary horizontal connections: General Sociology – Sociological Methodology (1st year), Sociology of the Family – Youth Studies (1st year), Social Anthropology – Sociology of Gender (2nd year). Students acquire fundamental knowledge (both general knowledge and knowledge from the area of a narrower professional focus), which they later expand through elective units (with a choice of units from lists of elective units). This provides them with a broader profile of knowledge and thus greater flexibility in the labour market on completion of their first-cycle studies

Assesment criteria

Criteria and methods for testing and assessing student outcomes are made publicly available and are implemented in accordance with the adopted learning programme, unit syllabuses and information on the unit. The assessment system is regulated in accordance with the Statutes of the University of Maribor and the Rules on testing and assessing knowledge at the University of Maribor. Both documents are available online at: https://www.um.si/o-univerzi/dokumentno-sredisce/. Learning outcomes are defined by syllabuses. These are made publicly available and are accessible to all. They can be found in the catalogue of post-Bologna Reform programmes and units (https://aips.um.si/PredmetiBP5/main.asp) and on the Faculty of Arts website (http://ff.um.si/studenti/studijski-programi/). The method of assessment and testing is defined in each syllabus. This means that, on the basis of the published syllabus content, students can compare or check the content and levels of knowledge associated with specific skills. Academic staff encourage continuous work and continuous testing of knowledge throughout the study process, in this way enabling students to maintain a constant overview of their own progress. Students are also verbally informed about assessment criteria and methods when they begin a unit. Following analyses of pedagogical work and evaluation of the programme, appropriate amendments are made to syllabuses. Verification of whether students are successfully meeting the requirements of the programme is done through the testing and assessment of knowledge, which is the basis on which students obtain marks and credits in individual units of the programme, allowing them to progress through the programme and move on to further studies. At the same time, it provides students with feedback on the level of knowledge they have attained. Exam results are entered in an electronic register called the Academic Information Subsystem (AIPS). Results are entered by the exam administrator, who has access to the details of the students entered for the exam. After entering the marks for an individual exam, the exam administrator submits a signed exam report to the Student Affairs Office. This report is kept permanently and represents an official record of the institution. Students are informed of exam results as soon as they are entered and confirmed by the exam administrator, via their personal AIPS account, which they access using a username and password. Students have the right to ask to see their marked exam papers within 30 days of publication of the results. Students’ knowledge is tested in examinations, colloquia and other forms of testing and assessment, and awarded a positive or negative mark. Positive marks are “excellent” (10), “very good” (9 and 8), “good” (7) and “satisfactory” (6). Negative marks are all marks from 1 to 5. Units may also be assessed as “passed”/“not passed” if the syllabus envisages this. The University of Maribor uses a uniform marking scale, which can be consulted online at: https://moja.um.si/student/Strani/Pravilniki-in-predpisi.aspx. Examination timetables are published in the publicly accessible calendar for each individual academic year (http://ff.um.si/studenti/urniki/). Lists of scheduled exam dates for individual units throughout the academic year are prepared by Departments and published by the Student Affairs Office in the AIPS by no later than 15 November for the current academic year.

Main study programme objectives

The primary aim of the first-cycle study programme in Sociology is to introduce students to professional work and research in the fields covered by sociological science and to provide them with the knowledge that is required in a services-based economy, in this way facilitating access to the labour market. On completion of the first cycle, students on both pathways will have acquired knowledge and analytical and social skills in the basic and applied disciplines of sociological science and certain other sciences related to sociology. These skills and knowledge are the basis for further education and specialisation in various forms of postgraduate study and professional development in sociology (and similar study programmes) while at the same time they are useful for jobs in which: (a) research methodology skills are used to address the majority of problems; (b) basic computer skills are needed; (c) academic and professional literature is subjected to critical interpretation; (d) statistical approaches are used in the preparation and performance of empirical research and practical work; (e) independent learning skills are used; (f) work tasks in various fields of activity (public administration, business enterprise sector, journalism, social welfare, etc.) are planned and organised autonomously. The study programme provides a suitable and well-rounded range of knowledge and skills that enable graduates to participate successfully in the labour market and at the same time provides them with the motivation and ability to continue their studies at the postgraduate (second-cycle) level, whether in sociology or in other social science programmes, either at UM or at other higher education institution in Slovenia or elsewhere. Graduates of the two-subject pathway in Sociology acquire solid fundamental and specialised knowledge of sociology which they can effectively combine with fundamental knowledge from another chosen study programme. They also acquire the ability to find and use new sources of knowledge, the ability to develop and enhance communication skills and other professional competences necessary for field-specific and interdisciplinary professional work on a lifelong basis, the ability to develop professional critical thinking and self-criticism, responsibility, initiative and independence in professional work and social activities.

General competences of graduates, gained at a study programme

The general competences developed by the study programme have been formulated on the basis of the wealth of experience gained from implementation of the educational process to date, while certain necessary modifications have been introduced following a thorough study of the current situation. General competences make up the general profile of the graduate. Competence development within the study process does not only involve the development of knowledge but also the student’s attitude to the application of this knowledge. This is an educative component that is inextricably linked to the educational component. Over the course of the first cycle, students acquire an essential range of universal knowledge of this kind, along with core knowledge about the unit or programme. In this sense, students develop understanding and the ability to apply knowledge to a point where they are able to demonstrate a professional and ethically correct approach to addressing professional problems, formulate proposals and positions when addressing professional problems within their professional field and support them with arguments, while remaining open to other arguments and new proposals. They also develop the learning skills that are needed for effective study at the university level and, at the same time, form a basis for further learning with a high degree of independence. The general competences acquired by students include: • knowledge and understanding of the history of the central discipline (sociology); • well-developed general and programme-specific (i.e. social science related) literacy (the ability to evaluate and generate social science discourses); • a well-developed ability to independently accumulate and apply knowledge and knowledge resources/sources; • a well-developed ability to observe, analyse, synthesise and critically appraise; • a well-developed capacity for self-criticism and the ability to oversee their own professional development; • a well-developed ability to work individually and as part of a team; • a well-developed ability to organise their own time and activities; • general competence in the use of information technology; • a well-developed ability to express, represent and argue a position through dialogue, with an emphasis on the progressive resolution of conflicts; • learning competence and a positive attitude towards lifelong learning; • the ability to resolve specific work problems through the application of scientific methods; • the ability to communicate and speak in public; • the ability to act in accordance with professional ethics; • well-developed sociological and intellectual curiosity; • the ability to resolve conflicts, communicate constructively and cooperate with others.

Subject specific competences of graduates, gained on a study programme

The subject-specific competences or learning outcomes of graduates of the two-subject pathway in Sociology include: • familiarity with basic and specific sociological concepts, the basic areas of sociological thematisation and the fundamental conceptual divisions of the sociological field • an understanding of the causes of individual social phenomena and the ability to explain them and predict changes and development in the future • a good grasp of fundamental sociological theories and the ability to use these theories to address various social phenomena and derive new interpretations • an understanding of the phenomenon of youth and a developing capacity to study youth in different cultural, historical and ideological contexts • familiarity with the characteristics of the concepts of family and parenthood and an understanding of individual forms of the family from different historical and cultural perspectives • familiarity with the fundamental concepts and approaches of social psychology and an understanding of their importance for other social sciences • familiarity with the basic concepts, approaches and study methods of social anthropology and an understanding of culture and the relationship between the individual and culture on the basis of socialisation as a fundamental social process • an understanding of political activity and the characteristics of political life in current conditions in the European Union and Slovenia • familiarity with the sociological discourse of gender, sexuality and gender identity and the ability to analyse and interpret the concept of gender from historical and intercultural perspectives • familiarity with fundamental sociological theories in education and the ability to compare individual education systems and analyse the relationship between education, the family and inequality • the ability to evaluate the characteristics and specificities of Slovenian society from an intercultural and international perspective, with an emphasis on understanding the dialectical nature of the processes that shape Slovenian society • familiarity with basic religious concepts in a sociological context and an understanding of the role of religion in modern society • the ability to autonomously produce academic or professional articles (finding sources, planning research, evaluation, presentation and analysis of results) • familiarity with the importance of sociology in various applied environments, an understanding of the role of sociology and various organisations and the ability to apply sociological knowledge and competences in various working environments • familiarity with basic statistical analyses in the social sciences and the use of various methods of data analysis to carry out independent statistical analyses • familiarity with sociological and anthropological views and theories of childhood and the ability to view the topic of children and childhood from an intercultural perspective

Access requirements

Study programme: Sociology, pathway: Sociology (two-subject) The following may enrol in the first-cycle Sociology study programme, Sociology pathway (two-subject): 1. anyone who has passed the general matura (school-leaving examination) 2. anyone who completed any four-year secondary school programme before 1 June 1995.

Selection criteria in the event of limited enrolment

If a decision is taken to limit places, applicants will be selected on the basis of: overall mark in the general matura or school-leaving exam 60% of points, overall marks in the third and fourth years 40% of points.

Transfer criteria between study programmes

Transfers between study programmes are possible in accordance with Articles 2 and 3 of the Criteria for Transfers between Study Programmes (UL RS, Nos 95/10, 17/11 and 14/19). Applicants who meet conditions for enrolment in the proposed programme and the conditions for transfer between programmes will be informed what year they may enrol in and what missing course units they must complete if they wish to conclude their studies under the new programme. Transfers are possible between programmes: - which guarantee the acquisition of comparable competences on completion and between which at least half the course units under the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) from the first study programme relating to compulsory units of the second study programme may be recognised under the criteria for recognising knowledge and skills acquired prior to enrolment in the programme.

Criteria for recognition of knowledge and skills, gained before the enrolment in the study programme

Under the Rules on the recognition of knowledge and skills in programmes of study at the University of Maribor (https://www.um.si/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Pravilnik-o-priznavanju-znanj-in-spretnosti-v-studijskih-programih-UM-st.-012-2019-2.pdf), knowledge, skills or competences acquired by a student through formal or non-formal learning before enrolling in the programme (“prior learning”) may be recognised in the education process. The fundamental criterion in the recognition process is the comparability of knowledge acquired elsewhere with the course units, skills and competences in the programme. Applications for the recognition of knowledge and skills acquired through various forms of formal and non-formal education before enrolling in the programme will be considered by the Faculty of Arts in accordance with regulations. The student submits an application for the recognition of knowledge and skills to the Academic Affairs Committee at the Faculty of Arts. Knowledge/skills can be recognised in full, recognised in part or not recognised. In cases where knowledge/skills are recognised in part, the student must sit a specific exam on content determined by the unit coordinator.

Criteria for completing the study

In order to complete the programme students must pass all exams and complete all course units prescribed by the curriculum, corresponding to at least 180 ECTS credits (90 ECTS credits from each part of the two-subject pathway).