SLO | EN
PRD-v18

1

Academic bachelor's studies

1 (prva)

7 (7)

0028181

6/2

2024/25

izr. prof. dr. GJOKO NIKOLOVSKI

SLOVENE LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

dipl. slov. (UN)
diplomirani slovenist (UN)
diplomirana slovenistka (UN)
B.A.
Bachelor of Arts

02 - Arts and humanities
0232 - Literature and linguistics

6 - Humanities

Text about acceptance

On the basis of Article 51 of the Law on higher education (Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 119/06-UPB3) and the Measures for the accreditation of higher education institutions and study programmes (Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 101/04) the Senate for accreditation with the Council of Higher Education of the Republic of Slovenia at its 4th meeting on 16th November 2007, adopted or gave consent to the university BA single-major study programme Slovene Language and Literature (Decree No. 2/75-2007 dated 20th November 2007).

Advancement criteria of a study programme

In order to progress to the second year, students must complete at least 48 ECTS credits. In order to progress to the third year, students must complete all first-year course units and second-year course units totalling at least 48 ECTS credits. Repetition, progression in exceptional circumstances and extension of student status are determined by the Statutes of the University of Maribor.

Criteria for completing separate parts of a study programme

The programme does not contain individual segments.

Study advancement options

The pathway provides an excellent basis for further study in the second cycle.

Employment possibilities

Our records show that more than 95% of graduates choose to pursue further studies in a second-cycle programme after completing the first cycle. Graduates of the first-cycle academic single-subject study programme Slovene Language and Literature are can be employed as editors, radio and television announcers, and journalists and work in roles such as commentators, moderators, content editors and reporters. They can also find roles in the fields of literary and cultural journalism and cultural and literary mediation, for example as literary critics. Graduates can occupy various roles in the tourism sector, work in advertising (making use of their sociolinguistic and psycholinguistic skills), work as PR representatives (communication skills, rhetoric), compose texts for clients, advise various institutions on language policy or work as social work associate professionals or as experts on education for persons with special educational needs.

Other obligations

- Horizontal and vertical integration of content: The curriculum is structured in such a way that all semesters include compulsory and elective units on literary history and theory, contemporary language and historical grammar. The compulsory units provide students with core knowledge and skills in both language and literature. Elective units enable them to expand and build on the content of the compulsory language or literary studies units, while the careful selection of elective units from the first year onwards allows students to study content that particularly interests them in greater depth. In this way, compulsory and elective units are horizontally integrated with each other, with the content of individual elective units complementing and building on the content of compulsory units. With an appropriate balance between compulsory and elective units, the linguistic foundations are laid for the study of content related to the contemporary language and its development, while a theoretical basis is provided for content related to Slovene and world literary history. The knowledge acquired through the units of an individual semester or year is the basis (but not a condition) for successful work in the units of the semesters that follow. In the first year, the two compulsory linguistics units that approach language from a synchronic perspective and, respectively, provide fundamental content on orthographic norms and pronunciation rules (Phonetics and Phonology) and familiarise students with approaches to linguistic research and the organisation of Slovene language research in the past and present (Theoretical Bases of Slovene Studies) are thematically integrated with the elective unit Slovene Language 1, where students further develop their theoretical and practical knowledge of the culture of oral and written expression or gain an insight into the state of the language and language changes in contact linguistic situations. The knowledge acquired integrates with the course unit Editing, which places the relationship between current linguistic norms and existing codification in the foreground. Units that study the Slovene language from a diachronic perspective are likewise thematically linked. These units familiarise students with the basics of the development of the language from Indo-European to Proto-Slavonic, and with the characteristics of Old Church Slavonic (Slavonic Linguistic Heritage), present the earliest phonetic changes in Proto-Slavonic following the settlement of the Slavs in the Alpine region, on the Karst plateau and in the Pannonian region (Development of the Slovene Language – Vocalism) and introduce students to pre-literary and literary tradition in Slovene (History of Literary Slovene). The linguistics units in the first year lay the foundations for content related to the contemporary Slovene language and its lexicons and for the in-depth study of the processes of language development, in this way providing vertical integration with the subsequent years of the programme. The compulsory literature units provide basic content on literary theory (Theory of Literature, Theory of Literary Genres) that is thematically linked to the essential concept of the study of literary history to which students are introduced in Introduction to the Study of Literature. The two literary theory units also serve to anchor all the literary history units in the first and subsequent years and are thus the foundation of the vertical integration of literary theory and literary history units in all years of the single-subject pathway within the first-cycle Slovene Language and Literature programme. Topics in the first year linked to the broad areas of literary studies and literary theory include the discussion of literary styles and movements in world literature (World Literature), milestones of Slovene written culture and Slovene literature in the Baroque and Enlightenment eras (Slovene Literature up to 1800), and children’s literature (Children’s Literature). The linguistics units in the second and third years are vertically integrated with the linguistics units in previous semesters via the progressive examination of individual linguistic levels and the history of the Slovene language in the period of its formation and normative stabilisation. The compulsory modern linguistics units in the second year provide interconnected content on morphology (Morphology), lexicology (Lexicology and Phraseology) and linguistic pragmatics (Linguistic Communication, Pragmatic Linguistics). The knowledge acquired in Morphology and in Lexicology and Phraseology enables students to consider the pragmatic meanings of specific morphological patterns and phraseological units and discover the pragmatic potential of phraseology in units covering linguistic pragmatics. Compulsory units on the history of the Slovene language familiarise students with variants of literary Slovene and the unification of Slovene literary language in the nineteenth century (Formation of a Uniform Literary Standard in the 19th Century); the content is vertically integrated with diachronic linguistics content from the first year and, at the same time, horizontally integrated with the content of Linguistic Interpretation of Early Slovene Texts, through which students gain an understanding of the processes of language development from the tenth to the nineteenth century and the content of the elective category Slovene Language 2, where students learn about the dual development of Slovene in the Alpine and Pannonian linguistic areas or gain insight into the formation of a uniform Slovene literary standard in the context of the Slovene national movement in the nineteenth century. Units on the history of the language connect to the dialectological units Slovene Dialects, where students learn the basic characteristics of Slovene dialect groups and the earliest phonetic, quantitative, qualitative and intonational changes from the origins of the Slovene language to the present day, and Dialect Lexicography, which introduces students to the basics of that discipline. The literary units in individual years or semesters trace the development of periods, genres and styles in Slovene literature, resulting in vertical integration. From semester to semester, students progressively familiarise themselves with the canon of Slovene literature from individual periods. The compulsory literature units in the second year encompass mutually complementary content from the development of literary movements and styles in the Slovene literature of the nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth, which also covers the position of this literature in Slovene literary tradition and European literary movements and currents (Slovene Romanticism and Realism, Literary Genres and Styles in Nineteenth-Century Slovene Literature, Slovene Modernism, Expressionism and Social Realism). The literary oeuvres of individual authors from the first half of the twentieth century are covered by Women Authors, Literary Genres and Styles in the Slovene Literature of the First Half of the Twentieth Century, which offers a literary historical overview and stylistic analysis of the works of the first Slovene women writers, poets and dramatists and a correction of earlier literary historical interpretations. Linked to these compulsory units in terms of content is Free Elective Unit 1, in which students familiarise themselves with the genre-diverse corpus of contemporary Slovene short prose or deepen their understanding of Slovene women’s authorship in connection with concepts from gender studies. Free Elective Unit 2 is vertically integrated with the literary studies units in the first year. The compulsory modern linguistics units in the third year integrate descriptions of the syntax of literary Slovene (Syntax) with word-formational (Word Formation) and text-linguistic (Text Linguistics) descriptions. The need for new competences and the study of corpus linguistics as productive form of language research have led to the inclusion of a Corpus Linguistics unit among the compulsory units. This adds an applied linguistics aspect to the programme and provides a theoretical basis for the corpus approach in linguistics. Language history units complement and enhance knowledge of the historical development of the Slovene language and the diachronic dimensions of linguistic phenomena and, by building on them, link vertically to the dialectological units from the second year. Elective language development modules also allow students to acquire the basics of a selected Slavonic language over the course of the programme. Compulsory literature units include thematically linked content from contemporary Slovene literature. The unit Slovene Literature After 1950 is complemented by Slovene Literature in Austria, which provides an overview of recent Slovene literature produced in Austria since 1960, and by units offering an insight into developmental trends in contemporary Slovene essay-writing and literary criticism (Introduction to Essay-Writing and Literary Criticism) and ideological and aesthetic currents in the contemporary Slovene periodical press and literary scene (Literary Magazines and Programmes Since 1950). The relationships between language, literary text and socio-historical context are covered by two units: From the Sermon to Short Prose and Metaphor and Symbol in Literature. At the vertical level these two units are integrated with the compulsory and elective literature units in all previous semesters. Content on contemporary Slovene literature is expanded by the content of units from the elective category Elective Unit 4. The curriculum also includes the units Slovene as a Second or Foreign Language 1 and Slovene as a Second or Foreign Language 2. These units are intended to provide foreign students at the University of Maribor with basic linguistic competences in Slovene. In this pathway, the units are offered in the sixth semester, while in the two-subject pathway, the same units are offered in the fifth semester. This enables foreign students to choose these units in all years and all semesters.

Assesment criteria

Criteria and methods for testing and assessing student outcomes are made publicly available and are implemented in accordance with the adopted learning programme, unit syllabuses and information on the unit. The assessment system is regulated in accordance with the Statutes of the University of Maribor and the Rules on testing and assessing knowledge at the University of Maribor. Both documents are available online at: https://www.um.si/o-univerzi/dokumentno-sredisce/. Learning outcomes are defined by syllabuses. These are made publicly available and are accessible to all. They can be found in the catalogue of post-Bologna Reform programmes and units (https://aips.um.si/PredmetiBP5/main.asp) and on the Faculty of Arts website (http://ff.um.si/studenti/studijski-programi/). The method of assessment and testing is defined in each syllabus. This means that, on the basis of the published syllabus content, students can compare or check the content and levels of knowledge associated with specific skills. Academic staff encourage continuous work and continuous testing of knowledge throughout the study process, in this way enabling students to maintain a constant overview of their own progress. Students are also verbally informed about assessment criteria and methods when they begin a unit. Following analyses of pedagogical work and evaluation of the programme, appropriate amendments are made to syllabuses. Verification of whether students are successfully meeting the requirements of the programme is done through the testing and assessment of knowledge, which is the basis on which students obtain marks and credits in individual units of the programme, allowing them to progress through the programme and move on to further studies. At the same time, it provides students with feedback on the level of knowledge they have attained. Exam results are entered in an electronic register called the Academic Information Subsystem (AIPS). Results are entered by the exam administrator, who has access to the details of the students entered for the exam. After entering the marks for an individual exam, the exam administrator submits a signed exam report to the Student Affairs Office. This report is kept permanently and represents an official record of the institution. Students are informed of exam results as soon as they are entered and confirmed by the exam administrator, via their personal AIPS account, which they access using a username and password. Students have the right to ask to see their marked exam papers within 30 days of publication of the results. Students’ knowledge is tested in examinations, colloquia and other forms of testing and assessment, and awarded a positive or negative mark. Positive marks are “excellent” (10), “very good” (9 and 8), “good” (7) and “satisfactory” (6). Negative marks are all marks from 1 to 5. Units may also be assessed as “passed”/“not passed” if the syllabus envisages this. The University of Maribor uses a uniform marking scale, which can be consulted online at: https://moja.um.si/student/Strani/Pravilniki-in-predpisi.aspx. Examination timetables are published in the publicly accessible calendar for each individual academic year (http://ff.um.si/studenti/urniki/). Lists of scheduled exam dates for individual units throughout the academic year are prepared by Departments and published by the Student Affairs Office in the AIPS by no later than 15 November for the current academic year.

Main study programme objectives

The aims of the programme derive from the nature of Slovene studies as a humanities discipline of particular national significance. The programme is structured in such a way as to familiarise students with the system of the Slovene language and its functioning in the practical circumstances of everyday use, and, on the other hand to provide a systematic and accurate overview of the development of Slovene literary history and theory, including comparisons with world literature. By providing students with a suitable range of core knowledge in language and literature disciplines, the programme is able to produce graduates with a good grounding in both language and literature and a broad cultural outlook, who will be capable of applying their knowledge in practice and responding adequately to the linguistic and cultural challenges of the modern age, and integrating successfully into the job market. The knowledge they acquire through the programme will also provide a solid foundation for the further, more narrowly specialised studies that this pathway leads to. One of the fundamental characteristics of the pathway is its clear articulation of core knowledge within Slovene studies through compulsory units while simultaneously offering students the opportunity to acquire a greater depth and breadth of specialist knowledge and a range of general and subject-specific competences through elective units. Learning outcomes can be assessed in accordance with set objectives, which, in view of the programme’s content, allow students to integrate the knowledge they have acquired from various linguistic and literary disciplines. Students acquire the skills for a basic interdisciplinary approach and gain the knowledge necessary to independently formulate fundamental starting points from which to seek new sources of knowledge. The pathway is structured in such a way that students pass gradually from general knowledge within their field of study to more specific knowledge. The single-subject pathway differs from the two-subject pathway in its broader range of contents and larger number of contact hours. The latter mainly consist of seminars and seminar-based practicals. This is the case above all in those units that are of central importance for the discipline. Seminar-based practicals give students the opportunity to apply practical knowledge to concrete cases, while seminars allow them to interpret linguistic phenomena, analyse literary works using new theoretical approaches and compare different models of literary interpretation, while gradually introducing them to independent professional work and research. Thanks to the scope and structure of the programme, graduates of this pathway gain a deeper insight into the discipline and while simultaneously acquiring the competences and skills needed for employment. Content that is only present in the single-subject pathway (in literary studies units such as Introduction to the Study of Literature, Literary Genres and Styles in Slovene Literature, From the Sermon to Short Prose, The Theme of Woman in Contemporary Literature, and in linguistics units such as Theoretical Bases of Slovene Studies, Editing, Linguistic Communication, Text Linguistics, Linguistic Interpretation of Early Texts, Linguistic Interpretation of Dialect Texts) deepens and broadens students’ insights into literary theory and introduces current aspects of literary history and theory and modern methodological approaches to a university course, deepens their understanding of the contemporary language standard and the principles of codification and their ability to interpret linguistic changes, and offers them opportunities to actively acquire the ability to critically evaluate social phenomena related to language. The knowledge acquired by graduates of the single-subject pathway serves as a good basis for employment in publishing, media (newspapers, radio, television), literary and cultural mediation, literary and cultural journalism, advertising and tourism. It also allows them to pursue further studies in a second-cycle programme, with or without a teacher education component. Thanks to the structure of the pathway, which from the very beginning is oriented towards seminar work and, thus, towards research, the best graduates also gain an excellent basis for doctoral study in a third-cycle programme.

General competences of graduates, gained at a study programme

- the ability to think in a logical, abstract, analytical and synthetic way; - practical proficiency in finding specialist literature on a specific topic and gathering bibliographic and other information; - the ability to autonomously keep abreast of current research and incorporate it appropriately into an already acquired system of knowledge; - a capacity for independent analysis and interpretation, comparative evaluation and historicisation; - the ability to articulate a problem in a well-argued manner and address it theoretically; - the ability to use appropriate methodological and terminological resources for the study of a specific topic; - the ability to integrate acquired knowledge; - the ability to express viewpoints in a professional and well-argued manner; - the ability to use information technology; - an awareness of the need for continuous professional development; - a capacity for self-reflection, sensitivity towards ethical issues and a commitment to professional ethics.

Subject specific competences of graduates, gained on a study programme

Graduates of the single-subject pathway acquire the following subject-specific competences: - familiarity with the basic terminology used in linguistics and literary studies, - familiarity with and the ability to use basic methods of linguistic and literary study, - the ability to understand a language standard and its codification, - the ability to evaluate texts in terms of their clarity, coherence and conformity to grammatical, orthographic and pronunciation norms, - language consulting and editing skills, - familiarity with linguistic levels within the context of general language structure, - the ability to understand texts in the context of their communicative function, - the ability to use digital language resources and language technology tools for contemporary Slovene, - the ability to observe and analyse linguistic phenomena through a corpus approach, - familiarity with language policy and language planning strategy in Slovenia, - ability to understand, identify and interpret language development processes, - the ability to record, analyse and interpret dialect texts, - familiarity with the methods and procedures of dialect lexicography, - familiarity with approaches to linguistic research and the organisation of Slovene language research in the past and present, - the ability to place Slovene cultural-historical phenomena in a socio-political and historical context, - familiarity with different historical and contemporary approaches to the study of literary genres, - familiarity with the literary movements, stylistic currents and themes, types, genres and styles of individual periods of Slovene literature, - the ability to analyse and interpret the thematic, typological, genological and stylistic characteristics of a literary work, - the ability to compare the development of world literature and Slovene literature and identify cases of interference, - familiarity with the dynamics of intercultural relations and the reception of foreign literary, aesthetic, philosophical and ideological currents in Slovene literature and culture, - familiarity with criteria for the evaluation of early, recent and contemporary literature, - the ability to analyse literary works using new theoretical approaches, - the ability to compare and contrast different models of literary interpretation, - the ability to write literary criticism, - familiarity with the organisation of literary magazines, the principles of editorial policies and the importance of magazines in literary production.

Access requirements

The following may enrol in the academic study programme Slovene Language and Literature: a) anyone who has passed the general matura (school-leaving examination), b) anyone who has passed the vocational matura in any secondary school programme and an examination in one general matura subject; the selected subject may not be a subject already taken by the applicant as part of the vocational matura, c) anyone who completed any four-year secondary school programme before 1 June 1995.

Selection criteria in the event of limited enrolment

If a decision is taken to limit places: applicants from points a) and c) will be selected on the basis of: mark in the general matura or school-leaving exam 40% of points, mark in Slovene in the general matura or school-leaving exam 40 % of points, overall marks in the third and fourth years 20% of points applicants from point b) will be selected on the basis of: mark in the vocational matura 30% of points, overall marks in the third and fourth years 10% of points, mark in Slovene in the vocational matura 40% of points, mark in one matura subject 10% of points, mark in Slovene in the fourth year 10% of points.

Transfer criteria between study programmes

Transfers between study programmes are possible in accordance with Articles 2 and 3 of the Criteria for Transfers between Study Programmes (UL RS, Nos 95/10, 17/11 and 14/19). Applicants who meet conditions for enrolment in the proposed programme and the conditions for transfer between programmes will be informed what year they may enrol in and what missing course units they must complete if they wish to conclude their studies under the new programme. Transfers are possible between programmes: - which guarantee the acquisition of comparable competences on completion and between which at least half the course units under the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) from the first study programme relating to compulsory units of the second study programme may be recognised under the criteria for recognising knowledge and skills acquired prior to enrolment in the programme.

Criteria for recognition of knowledge and skills, gained before the enrolment in the study programme

Under the Rules on the recognition of knowledge and skills in programmes of study at the University of Maribor (https://www.um.si/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Pravilnik-o-priznavanju-znanj-in-spretnosti-v-studijskih-programih-UM-st.-012-2019-2.pdf), knowledge, skills or competences acquired by a student through formal or non-formal learning before enrolling in the programme (“prior learning”) may be recognised in the education process. The fundamental criterion in the recognition process is the comparability of knowledge acquired elsewhere with the course units, skills and competences in the programme. Applications for the recognition of knowledge and skills acquired through various forms of formal and non-formal education before enrolling in the programme will be considered by the Faculty of Arts in accordance with regulations. The student submits an application for the recognition of knowledge and skills to the Academic Affairs Committee at the Faculty of Arts. Knowledge/skills can be recognised in full, recognised in part or not recognised. In cases where knowledge/skills are recognised in part, the student must sit a specific exam on content determined by the unit coordinator.

Criteria for completing the study

Students complete the programme when they have completed all course units prescribed by the programme, corresponding to 90 ECTS credits in the case of the two-subject pathway or 180 ECTS credits in the case of the single-subject pathway.

SLOVENE LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE

dipl. slov. (UN) in …
diplomirani slovenist (UN) in …
diplomirana slovenistka (UN) in …
B.A.
Bachelor of Arts

02 - Arts and humanities
0232 - Literature and linguistics

6 - Humanities

Text about acceptance

On the basis of Article 51 of the Law on higher education (Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 119/06-UPB3) and the Measures for the accreditation of higher education institutions and study programmes (Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 101/04) the Senate for accreditation with the Council of Higher Education of the Republic of Slovenia at its 4th meeting on 16th November 2007, adopted or gave consent to the university BA double major study programme Slovene Language and Literature (Decree No. 2/75-2007 dated 20th November 2007).

Advancement criteria of a study programme

In order to progress to the second year, students must complete at least 24 ECTS credits and the number of ECTS credits envisaged by the other chosen programme. In order to progress to the third year, students must complete all first-year course units, second-year course units totalling at least 21 ECTS credits and the number of ECTS credits envisaged by the other chosen programme.

Criteria for completing separate parts of a study programme

The programme does not contain individual segments.

Study advancement options

The pathway provides an excellent basis for further study in the second cycle.

Employment possibilities

Our records show that more than 90% of graduates choose to pursue further studies in a second-cycle programme after completing the first cycle. Graduates of the two-subject pathway of the academic first-cycle Slovene Language and Literature programme can work in various jobs in literary and cultural journalism and cultural mediation. They can also occupy various roles in the tourism sector, work in advertising (making use of their sociolinguistic and psycholinguistic skills), work as PR representatives (communication skills, rhetoric), compose texts for clients, teach Slovene as a second or foreign language or work as social work associate professionals or as experts on education for persons with special educational needs.

Other obligations

- Horizontal and vertical integration of content: The curriculum is structured in such a way that all semesters include compulsory and elective units on literary history and theory, contemporary language and historical grammar. The compulsory units provide students with core knowledge and skills in both language and literature. Elective units enable them to expand and build on the content of the compulsory language or literary studies units, while the careful selection of elective units from the first year onwards allows students to study content that particularly interests them in greater depth. In this way, compulsory and elective units are horizontally integrated with each other, with the content of individual elective units complementing and building on the content of compulsory units. With an appropriate balance between compulsory and elective units, the linguistic foundations are laid for the study of content related to the contemporary language and its development, while a theoretical basis is provided for content related to Slovene and world literary history. The knowledge acquired through the units of an individual semester or year is the basis (but not a condition) for successful work in the units of the semesters that follow. In the first year, the compulsory linguistics unit that approaches language from a synchronic perspective and provides fundamental content on orthographic norms and punctuation rules (Phonetics and Phonology) is thematically integrated with the elective unit Slovene Language 1, where students further develop their theoretical and practical knowledge of the culture of oral and written expression or gain an insight into language policy and language planning strategy in Slovenia. Units that study the Slovene language from a diachronic perspective are likewise thematically linked. These units familiarise students with the development of Proto-Slavonic from Indo-European and introduce Old Church Slavonic as a basis for the further study of historical Slavonic languages (Slavonic Linguistic Heritage), present the earliest phonetic developments (Development of the Slovene Language – Vocalism) and introduce students to pre-literary and literary tradition in Slovene (History of Literary Slovene). The linguistics units in the first year lay the foundations for content related to the contemporary Slovene language and its lexicons and for the in-depth study of the processes of language development, in this way providing vertical integration with the subsequent years of the programme. The compulsory literature units provide basic content on literary theory (Theory of Literature, Theory of Literary Genres). The two literary theory units also serve to anchor all the literary history units in the first and subsequent years and are thus the foundation of the vertical integration of literary theory and literary history units in all years of the two-subject pathway within the first-cycle Slovene Language and Literature programme. Topics in the first year linked to the broad areas of literary studies and literary theory include the discussion of literary styles and movements in world literature (World Literature), milestones of Slovene written culture and Slovene literature in the Baroque and Enlightenment eras (Slovene Literature up to 1800), and children’s literature (Children’s Literature). The linguistics units in the second and third years are vertically integrated with the linguistics units in previous semesters via the progressive examination of individual linguistic levels and the history of the Slovene language in the period of its formation and normative stabilisation. The compulsory modern linguistics units in the second year provide interconnected content on morphology (Morphology) and linguistic pragmatics (Pragmatic Linguistics) that facilitates discussion of the pragmatic meanings of specific morphological patterns. Compulsory units on the history of the Slovene literary language familiarise students with variants of literary Slovene and the unification of Slovene literary language in the nineteenth century; the content is vertically integrated with diachronic linguistics content from the first year and, at the same time, horizontally integrated with the content of the elective unit Slovene Language 2, where students familiarise themselves with the basics of dialect lexicography or the socio-political context of the formation of a uniform Slovene literary standard. Units on the history of the language connect to the dialectological unit Slovene Dialects, where students learn about the basic characteristics of Slovene dialect groups and the earliest linguistic changes from the origins of the Slovene language to the present day. The literary units in individual years or semesters trace the development of periods, genres and styles in Slovene literature, resulting in vertical integration. From semester to semester, students progressively familiarise themselves with the canon of Slovene literature from individual periods. The compulsory literature units in the second year encompass mutually complementary content from the development of literary movements and styles in the Slovene literature of the nineteenth century and the first half of the twentieth, which also covers the position of this literature in Slovene literary tradition and European literary movements and currents (Slovene Romanticism and Realism, Slovene Modernism, Expressionism and Social Realism). The literary oeuvres of individual authors from the first half of the twentieth century are covered by Women Authors, Literary Genres and Styles in the Slovene Literature of the First Half of the Twentieth Century, which offers a literary historical overview and stylistic analysis of the works of the first Slovene women writers, poets and dramatists. Linked to these compulsory units in terms of content is a Free Elective Unit, offering a choice of three literary studies units that are vertically integrated with the literary studies units from the first year. Students can replace the Free Elective Unit with units from other programmes at the Faculty of Arts, other faculties at the University of Maribor or other universities, which gives them the opportunity to integrate the knowledge they acquire not only within their own field but with other fields and, in this way, relate language and literature to philosophy, art, history, sociology or any other humanities or social science discipline to which the selected unit belongs. The compulsory modern linguistics units in the third year integrate descriptions of the syntax of literary Slovene (Syntax) with word-formational (Word Formation) and lexicological (Lexicology and Phraseology) descriptions. The language history unit Development of the Slovene Language – Consonantism and Morphology complements and expands knowledge of the historical development of Slovene and the diachronic dimensions of linguistic phenomena. Elective language development modules also allow students to acquire the basics of a selected Slavonic language over the course of the programme. The compulsory and elective literature units in the third year provide thematically linked content on contemporary Slovene and world literature. The unit Slovene Literature after 1950 is complemented by units offering an insight into developmental trends in contemporary Slovene essay-writing and literary criticism (Introduction to Essay-Writing and Literary Criticism) and ideological and aesthetic currents in the contemporary Slovene periodical press and literary scene (Literary Magazines and Programmes since 1950). The relationships between language, literary text and socio-historical context are covered by the unit Metaphor and Symbol in Literature, which is vertically integrated with the compulsory and elective literature units in all previous semesters. The curriculum also includes the units Slovene as a Second or Foreign Language 1 and Slovene as a Second or Foreign Language 2. These units are intended to provide foreign students at the University of Maribor with basic linguistic competences in Slovene.

Assesment criteria

Criteria and methods for testing and assessing student outcomes are made publicly available and are implemented in accordance with the adopted learning programme, unit syllabuses and information on the unit. The assessment system is regulated in accordance with the Statutes of the University of Maribor and the Rules on testing and assessing knowledge at the University of Maribor. Both documents are available online at: https://www.um.si/o-univerzi/dokumentno-sredisce/. Learning outcomes are defined by syllabuses. These are made publicly available and are accessible to all. They can be found in the catalogue of post-Bologna Reform programmes and units (https://aips.um.si/PredmetiBP5/main.asp) and on the Faculty of Arts website (http://ff.um.si/studenti/studijski-programi/). The method of assessment and testing is defined in each syllabus. This means that, on the basis of the published syllabus content, students can compare or check the content and levels of knowledge associated with specific skills. Academic staff encourage continuous work and continuous testing of knowledge throughout the study process, in this way enabling students to maintain a constant overview of their own progress. Students are also verbally informed about assessment criteria and methods when they begin a unit. Following analyses of pedagogical work and evaluation of the programme, appropriate amendments are made to syllabuses. Verification of whether students are successfully meeting the requirements of the programme is done through the testing and assessment of knowledge, which is the basis on which students obtain marks and credits in individual units of the programme, allowing them to progress through the programme and move on to further studies. At the same time, it provides students with feedback on the level of knowledge they have attained. Exam results are entered in an electronic register called the Academic Information Subsystem (AIPS). Results are entered by the exam administrator, who has access to the details of the students entered for the exam. After entering the marks for an individual exam, the exam administrator submits a signed exam report to the Student Affairs Office. This report is kept permanently and represents an official record of the institution. Students are informed of exam results as soon as they are entered and confirmed by the exam administrator, via their personal AIPS account, which they access using a username and password. Students have the right to ask to see their marked exam papers within 30 days of publication of the results. Students’ knowledge is tested in examinations, colloquia and other forms of testing and assessment, and awarded a positive or negative mark. Positive marks are “excellent” (10), “very good” (9 and 8), “good” (7) and “satisfactory” (6). Negative marks are all marks from 1 to 5. Units may also be assessed as “passed”/“not passed” if the syllabus envisages this. The University of Maribor uses a uniform marking scale, which can be consulted online at: https://moja.um.si/student/Strani/Pravilniki-in-predpisi.aspx. Examination timetables are published in the publicly accessible calendar for each individual academic year (http://ff.um.si/studenti/urniki/). Lists of scheduled exam dates for individual units throughout the academic year are prepared by Departments and published by the Student Affairs Office in the AIPS by no later than 15 November for the current academic year.

Main study programme objectives

The aim of the two-subject pathway in Slovene Language and Literature is to provide graduates with the basic theoretical knowledge of Slovene language and literature defined by the compulsory units. Elective units enable them to acquire additional knowledge of language-related subjects such as contemporary literary language and history of the Slovene language or to familiarise themselves with empirical approaches to language analysis (e.g. through an introduction to the methodology of corpus linguistics), while on the literary studies side they can deepen their knowledge of literary genres and styles in Slovene literature. Students can combine the knowledge they acquire with a carefully chosen second subject and in this way master the basics of an interdisciplinary research approach during the first cycle and create fundamental starting points from which to seek new sources of knowledge in the professional field. It is generally recognised today that the prime focal points of new knowledge and discoveries are the points of contact of between disciplines and sciences. The pathway ensures that students are qualified to carry out high-quality basic consulting and independent work in the language and literature fields, prepares them for further study, and motivates them for independent lifelong learning. The ultimate aim of the pathway is to produce graduates with a sufficiently specialised profile for professional work relating to a knowledge of Slovene language, literature and cultural history, in fields such as literary and cultural journalism, advertising and tourism, and to prepare them to undertake basic interdisciplinary professional work.

General competences of graduates, gained at a study programme

- the ability to think in a logical, abstract, analytical and synthetic way; - practical proficiency in finding specialist literature on a specific topic and gathering bibliographic and other information; - the ability to autonomously keep abreast of current research and incorporate it appropriately into an already acquired system of knowledge; - a capacity for independent analysis and interpretation, comparative evaluation and historicisation; - the ability to articulate a problem in a well-argued manner and address it theoretically; - the ability to use appropriate methodological and terminological resources for the study of a specific topic; - the ability to integrate acquired knowledge; - the ability to express viewpoints in a professional and well-argued manner; - the ability to use information technology; - an awareness of the need for continuous professional development; - a capacity for self-reflection, sensitivity towards ethical issues and a commitment to professional ethics.

Subject specific competences of graduates, gained on a study programme

- familiarity with the basic terminology used in linguistics and literary studies, - familiarity with and the ability to use basic methods of linguistic and literary study, - the ability to understand a language standard and its codification, - the ability to evaluate texts in terms of their clarity, coherence and conformity to grammatical, orthographic and pronunciation norms, - familiarity with linguistic levels within the context of general language structure, - the ability to use digital language resources and language technology tools for contemporary Slovene, - the ability to understand and identify language development processes, - the ability to record and analyse dialect texts, - the ability to place Slovene cultural-historical phenomena in a socio-political and historical context, - familiarity with different historical and contemporary approaches to the study of literary genres, - familiarity with the literary movements, stylistic currents and themes, types, genres and styles of individual periods of Slovene literature, - the ability to analyse and interpret the thematic, typological, genological and stylistic characteristics of a literary work, - the ability to compare the development of world literature and Slovene literature and identify cases of interference, - familiarity with the dynamics of intercultural relations and the reception of foreign literary, aesthetic, philosophical and ideological currents in Slovene literature and culture, - familiarity with criteria for the evaluation of early, recent and contemporary literature, familiarity with the organisation of literary magazines, the principles of editorial policies and the importance of magazines in literary production.

Access requirements

The following may enrol in the academic study programme Slovene Language and Literature: a) anyone who has passed the general matura (school-leaving examination), b) anyone who has passed the vocational matura in any secondary school programme and an examination in one general matura subject; the selected subject may not be a subject already taken by the applicant as part of the vocational matura, c) anyone who completed any four-year secondary school programme before 1 June 1995.

Selection criteria in the event of limited enrolment

If a decision is taken to limit places: applicants from points a) and c) will be selected on the basis of: mark in the general matura or school-leaving exam 40% of points, mark in Slovene in the general matura or school-leaving exam 40 % of points, overall marks in the third and fourth years 20% of points applicants from point b) will be selected on the basis of: mark in the vocational matura 30% of points, overall marks in the third and fourth years 10% of points, mark in Slovene in the vocational matura 40% of points, mark in one matura subject 10% of points, mark in Slovene in the fourth year 10% of points.

Transfer criteria between study programmes

Transfers between study programmes are possible in accordance with Articles 2 and 3 of the Criteria for Transfers between Study Programmes (UL RS, Nos 95/10, 17/11 and 14/19). Applicants who meet conditions for enrolment in the proposed programme and the conditions for transfer between programmes will be informed what year they may enrol in and what missing course units they must complete if they wish to conclude their studies under the new programme. Transfers are possible between programmes: - which guarantee the acquisition of comparable competences on completion and between which at least half the course units under the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) from the first study programme relating to compulsory units of the second study programme may be recognised under the criteria for recognising knowledge and skills acquired prior to enrolment in the programme.

Criteria for recognition of knowledge and skills, gained before the enrolment in the study programme

Under the Rules on the recognition of knowledge and skills in programmes of study at the University of Maribor (https://www.um.si/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Pravilnik-o-priznavanju-znanj-in-spretnosti-v-studijskih-programih-UM-st.-012-2019-2.pdf), knowledge, skills or competences acquired by a student through formal or non-formal learning before enrolling in the programme (“prior learning”) may be recognised in the education process. The fundamental criterion in the recognition process is the comparability of knowledge acquired elsewhere with the course units, skills and competences in the programme. Applications for the recognition of knowledge and skills acquired through various forms of formal and non-formal education before enrolling in the programme will be considered by the Faculty of Arts in accordance with regulations. The student submits an application for the recognition of knowledge and skills to the Academic Affairs Committee at the Faculty of Arts. Knowledge/skills can be recognised in full, recognised in part or not recognised. In cases where knowledge/skills are recognised in part, the student must sit a specific exam on content determined by the unit coordinator.

Criteria for completing the study

Students complete the programme when they have completed all course units prescribed by the programme, corresponding to 90 ECTS credits in the case of the two-subject pathway or 180 ECTS credits in the case of the single-subject pathway.