SLO | EN
PRD-v18

1

Academic bachelor's studies

1 (prva)

7 (7)

0028205

6/2

2024/25

doc. Doctor of philosophy, Združeno kraljestvo Velika Britanija in Severna Irska, SARA ORTHABER

ENGLISH

dipl. prevaj. št. – ang. (UN) in …
diplomant prevajalskih študij – angleščina (UN) in …
diplomantka prevajalskih študij – angleščina (UN) in…
B.A.
Bachelor of Arts

02 - Arts and humanities
0231 - Language acquisition

6 - Humanities

Text about acceptance

On the basis of Article 51 of the Law on higher education (Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 119/06-UPB3) and the Measures for the accreditation of higher education institutions and study programmes (Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 101/04) the Senate for accreditation with the Council of Higher Education of the Republic of Slovenia at its 4th meeting on 16th November 2007, adopted or gave consent to the university BA double major study programme Interlingual Studies - English (Decree No. 2/75-2007 dated 20th November 2007). During its 34th regular session on 29 September 2014, the Senate of the University of Maribor confirmed the change of the study programme name to Translation Studies – English. During its 5th regular session on 24 November 2015, the Senate of the University of Maribor confirmed the change of the study programme name to Interlingual Studies – English. During its 40th regular session on 29 January 2019, the Senate of the University of Maribor confirmed the change of the study programme name to Translation – English.

Advancement criteria of a study programme

In order to progress to the second year, students must complete at least 27 ECTS credits and the number of ECTS credits envisaged by the other chosen programme or pathway. In order to progress to the third year, students must complete all first-year course units, second-year course units prescribed by the programme totalling at least 27 ECTS credits and the number of ECTS credits envisaged by the other chosen programme or pathway.

Criteria for completing separate parts of a study programme

The programme does not contain conditions for completion of individual segments of the programme.

Study advancement options

Analysis of employability and the employment environment Translation Studies – English (two-subject pathway), Translation Studies – German (two-subject pathway) and Translation Studies – Hungarian (two-subject pathway) provide graduates with specific communication competences and initial translation competences and prepare them: a) to enter the labour market and take up employment in sectors that require competence in interlingual and intercultural mediation and language services competences, including outside the strict field of translation and interpreting, or b) to continue their studies in a second-cycle programme, in particular the Translation and Interpreting Programme offered by the Department of Translation Studies.

Employment possibilities

Analysis of employability and the employment environment Translation Studies – English (two-subject pathway), Translation Studies – German (two-subject pathway) and Translation Studies – Hungarian (two-subject pathway) provide graduates with specific communication competences and initial translation competences and prepare them: a) to enter the labour market and take up employment in sectors that require competence in interlingual and intercultural mediation and language services competences, including outside the strict field of translation and interpreting, or b) to continue their studies in a second-cycle programme, in particular the Translation and Interpreting Programme offered by the Department of Translation Studies. A review of available data from UM and the Employment Service of Slovenia (ESS) reveals that graduates of undergraduate programmes in the past have mainly chosen to continue their studies, whether at the Department of Translation Studies or at other departments of the Faculty of Arts or other faculties. Employment opportunities for translators and interpreters are traditionally good: employment data from ESS records for the specific category of translators and interpreters show, for example, that in 2019 and 2020 there were 55 jobs available in this specific occupational category. Thanks to the broad scope and multidisciplinary nature of the programme, graduates who opt not to continue their studies find opportunities in a wide range of fields that require their humanities and social science knowledge and competences. According to ESS figures, unemployed individuals from the translation and interpreting field find jobs with employers in sectors such as manufacturing, construction, retail, transport and logistics, hospitality, ICT, scientific/technical, public administration, defence, social security, education, culture, entertainment and recreation. All these sectors (can) include close contacts with foreign-speaking environments (including English, German and Hungarian) that require excellent knowledge of the mother tongue and a specific foreign language, as well as of the specific cultural environment in question. ESS figures show that six graduates of first-cycle programmes at the Department of Translation Studies registered with the ESS in September 2021, while 17 found employment in the same period. Overall figures for the period 2018–2021 show that 57 registered with the ESS in this period, while 63 found employment. Occupations in which graduates found employment in 2017 and 2018 include the following: conference and event organisers, database designers and administrators, financial and investment advisers, and sales personnel. Sectors in which graduates found employment in 2017 and 2018 include temporary employment agency services and support services for the performing arts. Analysis of the labour market and the translation sector In 2018 the situation in the translation, interpreting, subtitling and editing field in Slovenia was analysed in a White Paper on Translation that included detailed analysis of the situation, systemic and individual challenges, and examples of good practice in language occupations in Slovenia. Analysis of the translation industry in Slovenia showed, for example, that it is booming and that between 2004 and 2017 businesses in this sector doubled their revenue (from €20,317,000 in 2004 to €55,301,000 in 2017) and tripled their profits (from €1,596,900 in 2004 to €4,510,300 in 2017). In this period there were more than 1,680 legal entities in Slovenia that included translation and/or interpreting and/or language services among their registered activities. It is worth adding, however, that translation and interpreting are not regulated professions, which means that these activities can also be registered by individuals who do not have formal qualifications in this field. Another specific characteristic of the Slovenian translation market is that many translators and interpreters are self-employed (around 55%). Around 7% of translators are full-time employees of (translation) companies or public sector institutions, while around 30% are active as translators despite being employed in other occupations. Despite this, employment figures show that Translation Studies graduates of the Department of Translation Studies who go on to become translators and interpreters find their place in the labour market and thrive in their profession. Connection of the higher education institution with the environment There are six professional associations of translators and interpreters in Slovenia (Society of Slovene Literary Translators, Society of Film and Television Translators of Slovenia, Society of Scientific and Technical Translators of Slovenia, Association of Conference Interpreters of Slovenia, Association of Permanent Court Interpreters and Legal Translators of Slovenia, Society of Translators and Interpreters of Slovenia), with which the Department cooperates closely and, together with them, contributes to creating better conditions for translators in the Slovenian market. It is clear from the above that there is considerable demand for graduates of the first-cycle programmes offered by the Department of Translation Studies at the University of Maribor’s Faculty of Arts, both in Slovenia and outside it, and that these graduates successfully find employment or pursue further studies. In view of Slovenia’s intensive cooperation as a country in political, economic, trade, legal and other spheres, and the close ties of private legal entities with other countries, it is possible to expect future demand for high-quality translators and interpreters to remain stable in the long term.

Other obligations

- Horizontal integration of content: The curriculum consists of compulsory units and elective units that are vertically and horizontally integrated with each other. Compulsory units are divided into two pillars. The first pillar consists of units taken by all students regardless of pathway, and also includes practical training, while the second pillar consists of units divided by pathways: Common pillar: – common units: 12 ECTS credits or 14% of the programme – practical training: 3 ECTS credits or 3% of the programme Pathway-specific units: – language, theoretical content: 12 ECTS credits or 14% of the programme – language, language development: 24 ECTS credits or 26% of the programme – translation units: 21 ECTS credits or 23% of the programme – culture in literature: 9 ECTS credits or 10% of the programme Elective units: – elective units: 9 ECTS credits or 10% of the programme. The common units taken by students on all pathways enable the acquisition of linguistic and cultural competences in the mother tongue and offer introductory theoretical lectures and seminars on general linguistics and translation studies. Students of all pathways also participate in practical training. Pathway-specific units include translation units providing applicable knowledge and skills in the fields of translation and interpreting, units in the field of the culture and literature of the language in question, and units on literary-genre-related, culturological and social characteristics of the relevant foreign language area. Linguistic content and language development units provide well-rounded theoretical and applicable knowledge of the chosen foreign language. The two pillars ensure that students acquire in-depth theoretical and applicable knowledge in four fundamental areas, which is also reflected in the learning outcomes of the individual units. In addition to the compulsory categories, students may choose a total of three elective units corresponding to their preferences and interests from the units on offer (see Curriculum) and in this way deepen their knowledge in chosen fields over the course of the three-year programme. Finally, in the second year they undergo practical training, which gives them their first contact with a working environment. The concept offered is well thought out, since on the one hand if offers students a 10% share of elective components, while on the other it ensures, through the compulsory categories, a good balance of the necessary fundamental knowledge. The units link together horizontally within individual semesters, where language content related to the mother tongue reinforces understanding of the foreign language and the acquisition of grammatical structures in the selected foreign language (e.g. Slovene for Students of Other Languages 1, English Language – Introduction to English Linguistics, Language Development 1 – English); they are followed by logically connected units related to the focus of the course, i.e. interpreting, translation and interlingual and intercultural mediation (e.g. History of Translation and Interpreting, Writing and Language of Academic Texts (for Translation Students)); in addition to the horizontal integration of compulsory units, the programme offers horizontal integration with a wide selection of elective translation units (e.g. Professional Translation and Interpreting, International Organisations) and free elective units offered by other departments of the Faculty of Arts and other faculties of the University of Maribor. - Vertical integration of content: The programme also features vertical integration, with the majority of units designed in such a way that they are based on the knowledge acquired in previous semesters. The focus in the first year is on consolidating already acquired linguistic knowledge and skills and the acquisition of new knowledge, something that is reflected in the structure of units. Students acquire fundamental language skills and consolidate them practically through language development and written and oral communication. In the second year, language units and general units are joined by the first theoretical translation studies units and Introduction to Translation and Intercultural Mediation. The third year adds practical translation classes (Translation 1 and 2) and basic interpreting skills (consecutive, simultaneous, whispered), which make it easier for students to decide whether to continue their studies in the Department’s master’s programme. Practical training also gives students their first contact with potential working environments.

Assesment criteria

Criteria and methods for testing and assessing student outcomes are made publicly available and are implemented in accordance with the adopted learning programme, unit syllabuses and information on the unit. The assessment system is regulated in accordance with the Statutes of the University of Maribor and the Rules on testing and assessing knowledge at the University of Maribor. Both documents are available online at: https://www.um.si/o-univerzi/dokumentno-sredisce/. Learning outcomes are defined by syllabuses. These are made publicly available and are accessible to all. They can be found in the catalogue of post-Bologna Reform programmes and units (https://aips.um.si/PredmetiBP5/main.asp) and on the Faculty of Arts website (http://ff.um.si/studenti/studijski-programi/). The method of assessment and testing is defined in each syllabus. This means that, on the basis of the published syllabus content, students can compare or check the content and levels of knowledge associated with specific skills. Academic staff encourage continuous work and continuous testing of knowledge throughout the study process, in this way enabling students to maintain a constant overview of their own progress. Students are also verbally informed about assessment criteria and methods when they begin a unit. Following analyses of pedagogical work and evaluation of the programme, appropriate amendments are made to syllabuses. Verification of whether students are successfully meeting the requirements of the programme is done through the testing and assessment of knowledge, which is the basis on which students obtain marks and credits in individual units of the programme, allowing them to progress through the programme and move on to further studies. At the same time, it provides students with feedback on the level of knowledge they have attained. Exam results are entered in an electronic register called the Academic Information Subsystem (AIPS). Results are entered by the exam administrator, who has access to the details of the students entered for the exam. After entering the marks for an individual exam, the exam administrator submits a signed exam report to the Student Affairs Office. This report is kept permanently and represents an official record of the institution. Students are informed of exam results as soon as they are entered and confirmed by the exam administrator, via their personal AIPS account, which they access using a username and password. Students have the right to ask to see their marked exam papers within 30 days of publication of the results. Students’ knowledge is tested in examinations, colloquia and other forms of testing and assessment, and awarded a positive or negative mark. Positive marks are “excellent” (10), “very good” (9 and 8), “good” (7) and “satisfactory” (6). Negative marks are all marks from 1 to 5. Units may also be assessed as “passed”/“not passed” if the syllabus envisages this. The University of Maribor uses a uniform marking scale, which can be consulted online at: https://moja.um.si/student/Strani/Pravilniki-in-predpisi.aspx. Examination timetables are published in the publicly accessible calendar for each individual academic year (http://ff.um.si/studenti/urniki/). Lists of scheduled exam dates for individual units throughout the academic year are prepared by Departments and published by the Student Affairs Office in the AIPS by no later than 15 November for the current academic year.

Main study programme objectives

Primary aims: The academic study programme Translation Studies with its two-subject pathways English, German and/or Hungarian is a broadly specialised undergraduate programme in which students can focus exclusively on translation by choosing two pathways or, by choosing one pathway, combine translation with other non-teaching occupations (pedagogy, history, geography, etc.). The primary aim of the Translation Studies programme is to develop the linguistic, cultural and theoretical and applied translation knowledge and skills defined in the compulsory and elective units of the course. Through language-related and linguistics content, students strengthen their knowledge and develop their own awareness of Slovene as a native, national and official language, underlining its role as an essential element of national identity, while on the other hand acquiring knowledge of literature and developing proficiency in their selected foreign language for translation and interpreting purposes. Through cultural content, students learn about, analyse and evaluate the cultural, political, economic, social and other elements of Slovene culture and the culture of their chosen foreign language, in this way preparing themselves for the role of intercultural and cross-cultural mediators. Translation and translation studies content includes imparting thematic knowledge and basic strategic and methodological approaches which are then complemented by basic technical and technological skills for the needs of future translators. Finally, the programme strengthens students’ general, personal and interpersonal skills and provides them with practical abilities that enable them to transfer and apply theoretical knowledge in practice, address professional and work-related problems, find new sources of knowledge and use scientific methods. The programme is rounded off by elective content that enable students to develop their skills with regard to a specific topic or theme, expand their horizons or build professional competence.

General competences of graduates, gained at a study programme

General competences: - broad general knowledge and a broad general perspective as conditions for intercultural communication and mediation, - the ability to think analytically and synthetically, - the ability to critically evaluate own research achievements and those of others, - use of communication skills for tolerant and appropriate professional discourse, - the ability to apply the principles of autonomy and collaboration in own professional work, - the ability to collaborate constructively when working in a team and with other teams in virtual and physical environments, - the ability to plan and manage time, stress and workloads, - responsible use of social media and online resources for professional purposes, - the ability to work with the technical resources of a modern workplace, - readiness for autonomous learning and self-improvement.

Subject specific competences of graduates, gained on a study programme

Subject-specific competences: Subject-specific competences (skills) ensure that students are qualified to carry out high-quality basic consulting and independent work, i.e. translation of their chosen language or languages, prepare them for further study, and motivate them for lifelong learning and self-improvement. Subject-specific competences are defined in individual syllabuses as transferable/key skills and other attributes. Students of the Translation Studies programme acquire the following subject-specific competences for Slovene and their chosen foreign language: - mastery of the orthographic norms and pronunciation rules of the selected foreign language and standard Slovene, - a proficient understanding of morphemic and morphosyntactic categories and knowledge of the syntactic-textual structure of the languages studied, - an understanding of word-formational, interlexemic and phraseological relationships in the selected foreign language and Slovene from the point of view of new theoretical approaches in linguistics, - knowledge of earlier and contemporary currents in the selected foreign literature and Slovene literature, - the ability to autonomously keep abreast of current linguistic and literary phenomena and place them in the context of knowledge already acquired with regard to the languages studied, - the ability to engage publicly in the promotion of a higher writing and reading culture, - knowledge of historical, cultural, media, educational, economic and other characteristics, - contrastive analysis of texts and phenomena on the basis of already acquired knowledge from the intercultural and cross-cultural points of view, - location and use of related texts, creation of glossaries and dictionaries, - use of electronic aids and reference materials, - translation of easy and medium-difficult texts on various subjects into Slovene and a basic ability to defend translation choices, - translation of less complex texts from Slovene into the selected foreign language and a basic ability to defend translation choices, - knowledge of the basics of simultaneous and consecutive interpreting and note-taking techniques, - consecutive, simultaneous and whispered interpreting of less complex texts, - knowledge of the fundamental principles and aims of the most important international organisations, - the ability to autonomously keep abreast of current world events and place international organisations into this context, - knowledge of the basic principles of professional ethics and a developed sense for aesthetic and ethical values in the discipline, - knowledge of normal professional practice, conditions for self-employment and professional associations, - knowledge of general business communication, - professional awareness and familiarity with the role of the intercultural and cross-cultural mediator.

Access requirements

The following may enrol in the study programme Translation Studies: a) anyone who has passed the general matura (school-leaving examination), b) anyone who completed any four-year secondary school programme before 1 June 1995.

Selection criteria in the event of limited enrolment

If a decision is taken to limit places on the study programme Translation Studies – English (two-subject pathway), applicants will be selected on the basis of: overall mark in the general matura or school-leaving exam 40% of points, overall marks in the third and fourth years 10% of points, marks in English in the third and fourth years 20% of points, marks in Slovene in the third and fourth years 10% of points, mark in English in the general matura or school-leaving exam 20 % of points.

Transfer criteria between study programmes

Transfers between study programmes are possible in accordance with Articles 2 and 3 of the Criteria for Transfers between Study Programmes (UL RS, Nos 95/10, 17/11 and 14/19). Applicants who meet conditions for enrolment in the proposed programme and the conditions for transfer between programmes will be informed what year they may enrol in and what missing course units they must complete if they wish to conclude their studies under the new programme. Transfers are possible between programmes: - which guarantee the acquisition of comparable competences on completion and - between which at least half the course units under the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) from the first programme relating to compulsory units of the second programme may be recognised under the criteria for recognising knowledge and skills acquired prior to enrolment in the programme.

Criteria for recognition of knowledge and skills, gained before the enrolment in the study programme

Under the Rules on the recognition of knowledge and skills in programmes of study at the University of Maribor (https://www.um.si/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Pravilnik-o-priznavanju-znanj-in-spretnosti-v-studijskih-programih-UM-st.-012-2019-2.pdf), knowledge, skills or competences acquired by a student through formal or non-formal learning before enrolling in the programme (“prior learning”) may be recognised in the education process. The fundamental criterion in the recognition process is the comparability of knowledge acquired elsewhere with the course units, skills and competences in the programme. Applications for the recognition of knowledge and skills acquired through various forms of formal and non-formal education before enrolling in the programme will be considered by the Faculty of Arts in accordance with regulations. The student submits an application for the recognition of knowledge and skills to the Academic Affairs Committee at the Faculty of Arts. Knowledge/skills can be recognised in full, recognised in part or not recognised. In cases where knowledge/skills are recognised in part, the student must sit a specific exam on content determined by the unit coordinator.

Criteria for completing the study

Students of the Translation Studies programme complete the programme when they have completed all course units prescribed by the programme in the two programmes or two pathways in which they are enrolled, corresponding to a total of at least 180 ECTS credits (90 ECTS credits from one programme and 90 ECTS credits from the other).

GERMAN

dipl. prevaj. št. – nem. (UN) in …
diplomant prevajalskih študij – nemščina (UN) in …
diplomantka prevajalskih študij – nemščina (UN) in…
B.A.
Bachelor of Arts

02 - Arts and humanities
0231 - Language acquisition

6 - Humanities

Text about acceptance

On the basis of Article 51 of the Law on higher education (Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 119/06-UPB3) and the Measures for the accreditation of higher education institutions and study programmes (Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 101/04) the Senate for accreditation with the Council of Higher Education of the Republic of Slovenia at its 4th meeting on 16th November 2007, adopted or gave consent to the university BA double major study programme Interlingual Studies - German (Decree No. 2/75-2007 dated 20th November 2007). During its 34th regular session on 29 September 2014, the Senate of the University of Maribor confirmed the change of the study programme name to Translation Studies – German. During its 5th regular session on 24 November 2015, the Senate of the University of Maribor confirmed the change of the study programme name to Interlingual Studies – German. During its 40th regular session on 29 January 2019, the Senate of the University of Maribor confirmed the change of the study programme name to Translation – German.

Advancement criteria of a study programme

In order to progress to the second year, students must complete at least 27 ECTS credits and the number of ECTS credits envisaged by the other chosen programme or pathway. In order to progress to the third year, students must complete all first-year course units, second-year course units prescribed by the programme totalling at least 27 ECTS credits and the number of ECTS credits envisaged by the other chosen programme or pathway.

Criteria for completing separate parts of a study programme

The programme does not contain conditions for completion of individual segments of the programme.

Study advancement options

Analysis of employability and the employment environment Translation Studies – English (two-subject pathway), Translation Studies – German (two-subject pathway) and Translation Studies – Hungarian (two-subject pathway) provide graduates with specific communication competences and initial translation competences and prepare them: a) to enter the labour market and take up employment in sectors that require competence in interlingual and intercultural mediation and language services competences, including outside the strict field of translation and interpreting, or b) to continue their studies in a second-cycle programme, in particular the Translation and Interpreting Programme offered by the Department of Translation Studies.

Employment possibilities

Analysis of employability and the employment environment Translation Studies – English (two-subject pathway), Translation Studies – German (two-subject pathway) and Translation Studies – Hungarian (two-subject pathway) provide graduates with specific communication competences and initial translation competences and prepare them: a) to enter the labour market and take up employment in sectors that require competence in interlingual and intercultural mediation and language services competences, including outside the strict field of translation and interpreting, or b) to continue their studies in a second-cycle programme, in particular the Translation and Interpreting Programme offered by the Department of Translation Studies. A review of available data from UM and the Employment Service of Slovenia (ESS) reveals that graduates of undergraduate programmes in the past have mainly chosen to continue their studies, whether at the Department of Translation Studies or at other departments of the Faculty of Arts or other faculties. Employment opportunities for translators and interpreters are traditionally good: employment data from ESS records for the specific category of translators and interpreters show, for example, that in 2019 and 2020 there were 55 jobs available in this specific occupational category. Thanks to the broad scope and multidisciplinary nature of the programme, graduates who opt not to continue their studies find opportunities in a wide range of fields that require their humanities and social science knowledge and competences. According to ESS figures, unemployed individuals from the translation and interpreting field find jobs with employers in sectors such as manufacturing, construction, retail, transport and logistics, hospitality, ICT, scientific/technical, public administration, defence, social security, education, culture, entertainment and recreation. All these sectors (can) include close contacts with foreign-speaking environments (including English, German and Hungarian) that require excellent knowledge of the mother tongue and a specific foreign language, as well as of the specific cultural environment in question. ESS figures show that six graduates of first-cycle programmes at the Department of Translation Studies registered with the ESS in September 2021, while 17 found employment in the same period. Overall figures for the period 2018–2021 show that 57 registered with the ESS in this period, while 63 found employment. Occupations in which graduates found employment in 2017 and 2018 include the following: conference and event organisers, database designers and administrators, financial and investment advisers, and sales personnel. Sectors in which graduates found employment in 2017 and 2018 include temporary employment agency services and support services for the performing arts. Analysis of the labour market and the translation sector In 2018 the situation in the translation, interpreting, subtitling and editing field in Slovenia was analysed in a White Paper on Translation that included detailed analysis of the situation, systemic and individual challenges, and examples of good practice in language occupations in Slovenia. Analysis of the translation industry in Slovenia showed, for example, that it is booming and that between 2004 and 2017 businesses in this sector doubled their revenue (from €20,317,000 in 2004 to €55,301,000 in 2017) and tripled their profits (from €1,596,900 in 2004 to €4,510,300 in 2017). In this period there were more than 1,680 legal entities in Slovenia that included translation and/or interpreting and/or language services among their registered activities. It is worth adding, however, that translation and interpreting are not regulated professions, which means that these activities can also be registered by individuals who do not have formal qualifications in this field. Another specific characteristic of the Slovenian translation market is that many translators and interpreters are self-employed (around 55%). Around 7% of translators are full-time employees of (translation) companies or public sector institutions, while around 30% are active as translators despite being employed in other occupations. Despite this, employment figures show that Translation Studies graduates of the Department of Translation Studies who go on to become translators and interpreters find their place in the labour market and thrive in their profession. Connection of the higher education institution with the environment There are six professional associations of translators and interpreters in Slovenia (Society of Slovene Literary Translators, Society of Film and Television Translators of Slovenia, Society of Scientific and Technical Translators of Slovenia, Association of Conference Interpreters of Slovenia, Association of Permanent Court Interpreters and Legal Translators of Slovenia, Society of Translators and Interpreters of Slovenia), with which the Department cooperates closely and, together with them, contributes to creating better conditions for translators in the Slovenian market. It is clear from the above that there is considerable demand for graduates of the first-cycle programmes offered by the Department of Translation Studies at the University of Maribor’s Faculty of Arts, both in Slovenia and outside it, and that these graduates successfully find employment or pursue further studies. In view of Slovenia’s intensive cooperation as a country in political, economic, trade, legal and other spheres, and the close ties of private legal entities with other countries, it is possible to expect future demand for high-quality translators and interpreters to remain stable in the long term.

Other obligations

- Horizontal integration of content: The curriculum consists of compulsory units and elective units that are vertically and horizontally integrated with each other. Compulsory units are divided into two pillars. The first pillar consists of units taken by all students regardless of pathway, and also includes practical training, while the second pillar consists of units divided by pathways: Common pillar: – common units: 12 ECTS credits or 14% of the programme – practical training: 3 ECTS credits or 3% of the programme Pathway-specific units: – language, theoretical content: 12 ECTS credits or 14% of the programme – language, language development: 24 ECTS credits or 26% of the programme – translation units: 21 ECTS credits or 23% of the programme – culture in literature: 9 ECTS credits or 10% of the programme Elective units: – elective units: 9 ECTS credits or 10% of the programme. The common units taken by students on all pathways enable the acquisition of linguistic and cultural competences in the mother tongue and offer introductory theoretical lectures and seminars on general linguistics and translation studies. Students of all pathways also participate in practical training. Pathway-specific units include translation units providing applicable knowledge and skills in the fields of translation and interpreting, units in the field of the culture and literature of the language in question, and units on literary-genre-related, culturological and social characteristics of the relevant foreign language area. Linguistic content and language development units provide well-rounded theoretical and applicable knowledge of the chosen foreign language. The two pillars ensure that students acquire in-depth theoretical and applicable knowledge in four fundamental areas, which is also reflected in the learning outcomes of the individual units. In addition to the compulsory categories, students may choose a total of three elective units corresponding to their preferences and interests from the units on offer (see Curriculum) and in this way deepen their knowledge in chosen fields over the course of the three-year programme. Finally, in the second year they undergo practical training, which gives them their first contact with a working environment. The concept offered is well thought out, since on the one hand if offers students a 10% share of elective components, while on the other it ensures, through the compulsory categories, a good balance of the necessary fundamental knowledge. The units link together horizontally within individual semesters, where language content related to the mother tongue reinforces understanding of the foreign language and the acquisition of grammatical structures in the selected foreign language (e.g. Slovene for Students of Other Languages 1, English Language – Introduction to English Linguistics, Language Development 1 – English); they are followed by logically connected units related to the focus of the course, i.e. interpreting, translation and interlingual and intercultural mediation (e.g. History of Translation and Interpreting, Writing and Language of Academic Texts (for Translation Students)); in addition to the horizontal integration of compulsory units, the programme offers horizontal integration with a wide selection of elective translation units (e.g. Professional Translation and Interpreting, International Organisations) and free elective units offered by other departments of the Faculty of Arts and other faculties of the University of Maribor. - Vertical integration of content: The programme also features vertical integration, with the majority of units designed in such a way that they are based on the knowledge acquired in previous semesters. The focus in the first year is on consolidating already acquired linguistic knowledge and skills and the acquisition of new knowledge, something that is reflected in the structure of units. Students acquire fundamental language skills and consolidate them practically through language development and written and oral communication. In the second year, language units and general units are joined by the first theoretical translation studies units and Introduction to Translation and Intercultural Mediation. The third year adds practical translation classes (Translation 1 and 2) and basic interpreting skills (consecutive, simultaneous, whispered), which make it easier for students to decide whether to continue their studies in the Department’s master’s programme. Practical training also gives students their first contact with potential working environments.

Assesment criteria

Criteria and methods for testing and assessing student outcomes are made publicly available and are implemented in accordance with the adopted learning programme, unit syllabuses and information on the unit. The assessment system is regulated in accordance with the Statutes of the University of Maribor and the Rules on testing and assessing knowledge at the University of Maribor. Both documents are available online at: https://www.um.si/o-univerzi/dokumentno-sredisce/. Learning outcomes are defined by syllabuses. These are made publicly available and are accessible to all. They can be found in the catalogue of post-Bologna Reform programmes and units (https://aips.um.si/PredmetiBP5/main.asp) and on the Faculty of Arts website (http://ff.um.si/studenti/studijski-programi/). The method of assessment and testing is defined in each syllabus. This means that, on the basis of the published syllabus content, students can compare or check the content and levels of knowledge associated with specific skills. Academic staff encourage continuous work and continuous testing of knowledge throughout the study process, in this way enabling students to maintain a constant overview of their own progress. Students are also verbally informed about assessment criteria and methods when they begin a unit. Following analyses of pedagogical work and evaluation of the programme, appropriate amendments are made to syllabuses. Verification of whether students are successfully meeting the requirements of the programme is done through the testing and assessment of knowledge, which is the basis on which students obtain marks and credits in individual units of the programme, allowing them to progress through the programme and move on to further studies. At the same time, it provides students with feedback on the level of knowledge they have attained. Exam results are entered in an electronic register called the Academic Information Subsystem (AIPS). Results are entered by the exam administrator, who has access to the details of the students entered for the exam. After entering the marks for an individual exam, the exam administrator submits a signed exam report to the Student Affairs Office. This report is kept permanently and represents an official record of the institution. Students are informed of exam results as soon as they are entered and confirmed by the exam administrator, via their personal AIPS account, which they access using a username and password. Students have the right to ask to see their marked exam papers within 30 days of publication of the results. Students’ knowledge is tested in examinations, colloquia and other forms of testing and assessment, and awarded a positive or negative mark. Positive marks are “excellent” (10), “very good” (9 and 8), “good” (7) and “satisfactory” (6). Negative marks are all marks from 1 to 5. Units may also be assessed as “passed”/“not passed” if the syllabus envisages this. The University of Maribor uses a uniform marking scale, which can be consulted online at: https://moja.um.si/student/Strani/Pravilniki-in-predpisi.aspx. Examination timetables are published in the publicly accessible calendar for each individual academic year (http://ff.um.si/studenti/urniki/). Lists of scheduled exam dates for individual units throughout the academic year are prepared by Departments and published by the Student Affairs Office in the AIPS by no later than 15 November for the current academic year.

Main study programme objectives

The academic study programme Translation Studies with its two-subject pathways English, German and/or Hungarian is a broadly specialised undergraduate programme in which students can focus exclusively on translation by choosing two pathways or, by choosing one pathway, combine translation with other non-teaching occupations (pedagogy, history, geography, etc.). The primary aim of the Translation Studies programme is to develop the linguistic, cultural and theoretical and applied translation knowledge and skills defined in the compulsory and elective units of the course. Through language-related and linguistics content, students strengthen their knowledge and develop their own awareness of Slovene as a native, national and official language, underlining its role as an essential element of national identity, while on the other hand acquiring knowledge of literature and developing proficiency in their selected foreign language for translation and interpreting purposes. Through cultural content, students learn about, analyse and evaluate the cultural, political, economic, social and other elements of Slovene culture and the culture of their chosen foreign language, in this way preparing themselves for the role of intercultural and cross-cultural mediators. Translation and translation studies content includes imparting thematic knowledge and basic strategic and methodological approaches which are then complemented by basic technical and technological skills for the needs of future translators. Finally, the programme strengthens students’ general, personal and interpersonal skills and provides them with practical abilities that enable them to transfer and apply theoretical knowledge in practice, address professional and work-related problems, find new sources of knowledge and use scientific methods. The programme is rounded off by elective content that enable students to develop their skills with regard to a specific topic or theme, expand their horizons or build professional competence.

General competences of graduates, gained at a study programme

- broad general knowledge and a broad general perspective as conditions for intercultural communication and mediation, - the ability to think analytically and synthetically, - the ability to critically evaluate own research achievements and those of others, - use of communication skills for tolerant and appropriate professional discourse, - the ability to apply the principles of autonomy and collaboration in own professional work, - the ability to collaborate constructively when working in a team and with other teams in virtual and physical environments, - the ability to plan and manage time, stress and workloads, - responsible use of social media and online resources for professional purposes, - the ability to work with the technical resources of a modern workplace, - readiness for autonomous learning and self-improvement.

Subject specific competences of graduates, gained on a study programme

Subject-specific competences (skills) ensure that students are qualified to carry out high-quality basic consulting and independent work, i.e. translation of their chosen language or languages, prepare them for further study, and motivate them for lifelong learning and self-improvement. Subject-specific competences are defined in individual syllabuses as transferable/key skills and other attributes. Students of the Translation Studies programme acquire the following subject-specific competences for Slovene and their chosen foreign language: - mastery of the orthographic norms and pronunciation rules of the selected foreign language and standard Slovene, - a proficient understanding of morphemic and morphosyntactic categories and knowledge of the syntactic-textual structure of the languages studied, - an understanding of word-formational, interlexemic and phraseological relationships in the selected foreign language and Slovene from the point of view of new theoretical approaches in linguistics, - knowledge of earlier and contemporary currents in the selected foreign literature and Slovene literature, - the ability to autonomously keep abreast of current linguistic and literary phenomena and place them in the context of knowledge already acquired with regard to the languages studied, - the ability to engage publicly in the promotion of a higher writing and reading culture, - knowledge of historical, cultural, media, educational, economic and other characteristics, - contrastive analysis of texts and phenomena on the basis of already acquired knowledge from the intercultural and cross-cultural points of view, - location and use of related texts, creation of glossaries and dictionaries, - use of electronic aids and reference materials, - translation of easy and medium-difficult texts on various subjects into Slovene and a basic ability to defend translation choices, - translation of less complex texts from Slovene into the selected foreign language and a basic ability to defend translation choices, - knowledge of the basics of simultaneous and consecutive interpreting and note-taking techniques, - consecutive, simultaneous and whispered interpreting of less complex texts, - knowledge of the fundamental principles and aims of the most important international organisations, - the ability to autonomously keep abreast of current world events and place international organisations into this context, - knowledge of the basic principles of professional ethics and a developed sense for aesthetic and ethical values in the discipline, - knowledge of normal professional practice, conditions for self-employment and professional associations, - knowledge of general business communication, - professional awareness and familiarity with the role of the intercultural and cross-cultural mediator.

Access requirements

The following may enrol in the study programme Translation Studies: a) anyone who has passed the general matura (school-leaving examination), b) anyone who completed any four-year secondary school programme before 1 June 1995.

Selection criteria in the event of limited enrolment

If a decision is taken to limit places on the study programme Translation Studies – German (two-subject pathway), applicants will be selected on the basis of: overall mark in the general matura or school-leaving exam 40% of points, overall marks in the third and fourth years 10% of points, marks in German in the third and fourth years 20% of points, marks in Slovene in the third and fourth years 10% of points, mark in German in the general matura or school-leaving exam 20 % of points.

Transfer criteria between study programmes

Transfers between study programmes are possible in accordance with Articles 2 and 3 of the Criteria for Transfers between Study Programmes (UL RS, Nos 95/10, 17/11 and 14/19). Applicants who meet conditions for enrolment in the proposed programme and the conditions for transfer between programmes will be informed what year they may enrol in and what missing course units they must complete if they wish to conclude their studies under the new programme. Transfers are possible between programmes: - which guarantee the acquisition of comparable competences on completion and - between which at least half the course units under the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) from the first programme relating to compulsory units of the second programme may be recognised under the criteria for recognising knowledge and skills acquired prior to enrolment in the programme.

Criteria for recognition of knowledge and skills, gained before the enrolment in the study programme

Under the Rules on the recognition of knowledge and skills in programmes of study at the University of Maribor (https://www.um.si/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Pravilnik-o-priznavanju-znanj-in-spretnosti-v-studijskih-programih-UM-st.-012-2019-2.pdf), knowledge, skills or competences acquired by a student through formal or non-formal learning before enrolling in the programme (“prior learning”) may be recognised in the education process. The fundamental criterion in the recognition process is the comparability of knowledge acquired elsewhere with the course units, skills and competences in the programme. Applications for the recognition of knowledge and skills acquired through various forms of formal and non-formal education before enrolling in the programme will be considered by the Faculty of Arts in accordance with regulations. The student submits an application for the recognition of knowledge and skills to the Academic Affairs Committee at the Faculty of Arts. Knowledge/skills can be recognised in full, recognised in part or not recognised. In cases where knowledge/skills are recognised in part, the student must sit a specific exam on content determined by the unit coordinator.

Criteria for completing the study

Students of the Translation Studies programme complete the programme when they have completed all course units prescribed by the programme in the two programmes or two pathways in which they are enrolled, corresponding to a total of at least 180 ECTS credits (90 ECTS credits from one programme and 90 ECTS credits from the other).

HUNGARIAN

dipl. prevaj. št. – madž. (UN) in …
diplomant prevajalskih študij – madžarščina (UN) in …
diplomantka prevajalskih študij – madžarščina (UN) in…
B.A.
Bachelor of Arts

02 - Arts and humanities
0231 - Language acquisition

6 - Humanities

Text about acceptance

On the basis of Article 51 of the Law on higher education (Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 119/06-UPB3) and the Measures for the accreditation of higher education institutions and study programmes (Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 101/04) the Senate for accreditation with the Council of Higher Education of the Republic of Slovenia at its 4th meeting on 16th November 2007, adopted or gave consent to the university BA double major study programme Interlingual Studies - Hungarian (Decree No. 2/75-2007 dated 20th November 2007). During its 34th regular session on 29 September 2014, the Senate of the University of Maribor confirmed the change of the study programme name to Translation Studies – Hungarian. During its 5th regular session on 24 November 2015, the Senate of the University of Maribor confirmed the change of the study programme name to Interlingual Studies – Hungarian. During its 40th regular session on 29 January 2019, the Senate of the University of Maribor confirmed the change of the study programme name to Translation – Hungarian.

Advancement criteria of a study programme

In order to progress to the second year, students must complete at least 27 ECTS credits and the number of ECTS credits envisaged by the other chosen programme or pathway. In order to progress to the third year, students must complete all first-year course units, second-year course units prescribed by the programme totalling at least 27 ECTS credits and the number of ECTS credits envisaged by the other chosen programme or pathway.

Criteria for completing separate parts of a study programme

The programme does not contain conditions for completion of individual segments of the programme.

Study advancement options

Analysis of employability and the employment environment Translation Studies – English (two-subject pathway), Translation Studies – German (two-subject pathway) and Translation Studies – Hungarian (two-subject pathway) provide graduates with specific communication competences and initial translation competences and prepare them: a) to enter the labour market and take up employment in sectors that require competence in interlingual and intercultural mediation and language services competences, including outside the strict field of translation and interpreting, or b) to continue their studies in a second-cycle programme, in particular the Translation and Interpreting Programme offered by the Department of Translation Studies.

Employment possibilities

Analysis of employability and the employment environment Translation Studies – English (two-subject pathway), Translation Studies – German (two-subject pathway) and Translation Studies – Hungarian (two-subject pathway) provide graduates with specific communication competences and initial translation competences and prepare them: a) to enter the labour market and take up employment in sectors that require competence in interlingual and intercultural mediation and language services competences, including outside the strict field of translation and interpreting, or b) to continue their studies in a second-cycle programme, in particular the Translation and Interpreting Programme offered by the Department of Translation Studies. A review of available data from UM and the Employment Service of Slovenia (ESS) reveals that graduates of undergraduate programmes in the past have mainly chosen to continue their studies, whether at the Department of Translation Studies or at other departments of the Faculty of Arts or other faculties. Employment opportunities for translators and interpreters are traditionally good: employment data from ESS records for the specific category of translators and interpreters show, for example, that in 2019 and 2020 there were 55 jobs available in this specific occupational category. Thanks to the broad scope and multidisciplinary nature of the programme, graduates who opt not to continue their studies find opportunities in a wide range of fields that require their humanities and social science knowledge and competences. According to ESS figures, unemployed individuals from the translation and interpreting field find jobs with employers in sectors such as manufacturing, construction, retail, transport and logistics, hospitality, ICT, scientific/technical, public administration, defence, social security, education, culture, entertainment and recreation. All these sectors (can) include close contacts with foreign-speaking environments (including English, German and Hungarian) that require excellent knowledge of the mother tongue and a specific foreign language, as well as of the specific cultural environment in question. ESS figures show that six graduates of first-cycle programmes at the Department of Translation Studies registered with the ESS in September 2021, while 17 found employment in the same period. Overall figures for the period 2018–2021 show that 57 registered with the ESS in this period, while 63 found employment. Occupations in which graduates found employment in 2017 and 2018 include the following: conference and event organisers, database designers and administrators, financial and investment advisers, and sales personnel. Sectors in which graduates found employment in 2017 and 2018 include temporary employment agency services and support services for the performing arts. Analysis of the labour market and the translation sector In 2018 the situation in the translation, interpreting, subtitling and editing field in Slovenia was analysed in a White Paper on Translation that included detailed analysis of the situation, systemic and individual challenges, and examples of good practice in language occupations in Slovenia. Analysis of the translation industry in Slovenia showed, for example, that it is booming and that between 2004 and 2017 businesses in this sector doubled their revenue (from €20,317,000 in 2004 to €55,301,000 in 2017) and tripled their profits (from €1,596,900 in 2004 to €4,510,300 in 2017). In this period there were more than 1,680 legal entities in Slovenia that included translation and/or interpreting and/or language services among their registered activities. It is worth adding, however, that translation and interpreting are not regulated professions, which means that these activities can also be registered by individuals who do not have formal qualifications in this field. Another specific characteristic of the Slovenian translation market is that many translators and interpreters are self-employed (around 55%). Around 7% of translators are full-time employees of (translation) companies or public sector institutions, while around 30% are active as translators despite being employed in other occupations. Despite this, employment figures show that Translation Studies graduates of the Department of Translation Studies who go on to become translators and interpreters find their place in the labour market and thrive in their profession. Connection of the higher education institution with the environment There are six professional associations of translators and interpreters in Slovenia (Society of Slovene Literary Translators, Society of Film and Television Translators of Slovenia, Society of Scientific and Technical Translators of Slovenia, Association of Conference Interpreters of Slovenia, Association of Permanent Court Interpreters and Legal Translators of Slovenia, Society of Translators and Interpreters of Slovenia), with which the Department cooperates closely and, together with them, contributes to creating better conditions for translators in the Slovenian market. It is clear from the above that there is considerable demand for graduates of the first-cycle programmes offered by the Department of Translation Studies at the University of Maribor’s Faculty of Arts, both in Slovenia and outside it, and that these graduates successfully find employment or pursue further studies. In view of Slovenia’s intensive cooperation as a country in political, economic, trade, legal and other spheres, and the close ties of private legal entities with other countries, it is possible to expect future demand for high-quality translators and interpreters to remain stable in the long term.

Other obligations

- Horizontal integration of content: The curriculum consists of compulsory units and elective units that are vertically and horizontally integrated with each other. Compulsory units are divided into two pillars. The first pillar consists of units taken by all students regardless of pathway, and also includes practical training, while the second pillar consists of units divided by pathways: Common pillar: – common units: 12 ECTS credits or 14% of the programme – practical training: 3 ECTS credits or 3% of the programme Pathway-specific units: – language, theoretical content: 12 ECTS credits or 14% of the programme – language, language development: 24 ECTS credits or 26% of the programme – translation units: 21 ECTS credits or 23% of the programme – culture in literature: 9 ECTS credits or 10% of the programme Elective units: – elective units: 9 ECTS credits or 10% of the programme. The common units taken by students on all pathways enable the acquisition of linguistic and cultural competences in the mother tongue and offer introductory theoretical lectures and seminars on general linguistics and translation studies. Students of all pathways also participate in practical training. Pathway-specific units include translation units providing applicable knowledge and skills in the fields of translation and interpreting, units in the field of the culture and literature of the language in question, and units on literary-genre-related, culturological and social characteristics of the relevant foreign language area. Linguistic content and language development units provide well-rounded theoretical and applicable knowledge of the chosen foreign language. The two pillars ensure that students acquire in-depth theoretical and applicable knowledge in four fundamental areas, which is also reflected in the learning outcomes of the individual units. In addition to the compulsory categories, students may choose a total of three elective units corresponding to their preferences and interests from the units on offer (see Curriculum) and in this way deepen their knowledge in chosen fields over the course of the three-year programme. Finally, in the second year they undergo practical training, which gives them their first contact with a working environment. The concept offered is well thought out, since on the one hand if offers students a 10% share of elective components, while on the other it ensures, through the compulsory categories, a good balance of the necessary fundamental knowledge. The units link together horizontally within individual semesters, where language content related to the mother tongue reinforces understanding of the foreign language and the acquisition of grammatical structures in the selected foreign language (e.g. Slovene for Students of Other Languages 1, English Language – Introduction to English Linguistics, Language Development 1 – English); they are followed by logically connected units related to the focus of the course, i.e. interpreting, translation and interlingual and intercultural mediation (e.g. History of Translation and Interpreting, Writing and Language of Academic Texts (for Translation Students)); in addition to the horizontal integration of compulsory units, the programme offers horizontal integration with a wide selection of elective translation units (e.g. Professional Translation and Interpreting, International Organisations) and free elective units offered by other departments of the Faculty of Arts and other faculties of the University of Maribor. - Vertical integration of content: The programme also features vertical integration, with the majority of units designed in such a way that they are based on the knowledge acquired in previous semesters. The focus in the first year is on consolidating already acquired linguistic knowledge and skills and the acquisition of new knowledge, something that is reflected in the structure of units. Students acquire fundamental language skills and consolidate them practically through language development and written and oral communication. In the second year, language units and general units are joined by the first theoretical translation studies units and Introduction to Translation and Intercultural Mediation. The third year adds practical translation classes (Translation 1 and 2) and basic interpreting skills (consecutive, simultaneous, whispered), which make it easier for students to decide whether to continue their studies in the Department’s master’s programme. Practical training also gives students their first contact with potential working environments.

Assesment criteria

Criteria and methods for testing and assessing student outcomes are made publicly available and are implemented in accordance with the adopted learning programme, unit syllabuses and information on the unit. The assessment system is regulated in accordance with the Statutes of the University of Maribor and the Rules on testing and assessing knowledge at the University of Maribor. Both documents are available online at: https://www.um.si/o-univerzi/dokumentno-sredisce/. Learning outcomes are defined by syllabuses. These are made publicly available and are accessible to all. They can be found in the catalogue of post-Bologna Reform programmes and units (https://aips.um.si/PredmetiBP5/main.asp) and on the Faculty of Arts website (http://ff.um.si/studenti/studijski-programi/). The method of assessment and testing is defined in each syllabus. This means that, on the basis of the published syllabus content, students can compare or check the content and levels of knowledge associated with specific skills. Academic staff encourage continuous work and continuous testing of knowledge throughout the study process, in this way enabling students to maintain a constant overview of their own progress. Students are also verbally informed about assessment criteria and methods when they begin a unit. Following analyses of pedagogical work and evaluation of the programme, appropriate amendments are made to syllabuses. Verification of whether students are successfully meeting the requirements of the programme is done through the testing and assessment of knowledge, which is the basis on which students obtain marks and credits in individual units of the programme, allowing them to progress through the programme and move on to further studies. At the same time, it provides students with feedback on the level of knowledge they have attained. Exam results are entered in an electronic register called the Academic Information Subsystem (AIPS). Results are entered by the exam administrator, who has access to the details of the students entered for the exam. After entering the marks for an individual exam, the exam administrator submits a signed exam report to the Student Affairs Office. This report is kept permanently and represents an official record of the institution. Students are informed of exam results as soon as they are entered and confirmed by the exam administrator, via their personal AIPS account, which they access using a username and password. Students have the right to ask to see their marked exam papers within 30 days of publication of the results. Students’ knowledge is tested in examinations, colloquia and other forms of testing and assessment, and awarded a positive or negative mark. Positive marks are “excellent” (10), “very good” (9 and 8), “good” (7) and “satisfactory” (6). Negative marks are all marks from 1 to 5. Units may also be assessed as “passed”/“not passed” if the syllabus envisages this. The University of Maribor uses a uniform marking scale, which can be consulted online at: https://moja.um.si/student/Strani/Pravilniki-in-predpisi.aspx. Examination timetables are published in the publicly accessible calendar for each individual academic year (http://ff.um.si/studenti/urniki/). Lists of scheduled exam dates for individual units throughout the academic year are prepared by Departments and published by the Student Affairs Office in the AIPS by no later than 15 November for the current academic year.

Main study programme objectives

The academic study programme Translation Studies with its two-subject pathways English, German and/or Hungarian is a broadly specialised undergraduate programme in which students can focus exclusively on translation by choosing two pathways or, by choosing one pathway, combine translation with other non-teaching occupations (pedagogy, history, geography, etc.). The primary aim of the Translation Studies programme is to develop the linguistic, cultural and theoretical and applied translation knowledge and skills defined in the compulsory and elective units of the course. Through language-related and linguistics content, students strengthen their knowledge and develop their own awareness of Slovene as a native, national and official language, underlining its role as an essential element of national identity, while on the other hand acquiring knowledge of literature and developing proficiency in their selected foreign language for translation and interpreting purposes. Through cultural content, students learn about, analyse and evaluate the cultural, political, economic, social and other elements of Slovene culture and the culture of their chosen foreign language, in this way preparing themselves for the role of intercultural and cross-cultural mediators. Translation and translation studies content includes imparting thematic knowledge and basic strategic and methodological approaches which are then complemented by basic technical and technological skills for the needs of future translators. Finally, the programme strengthens students’ general, personal and interpersonal skills and provides them with practical abilities that enable them to transfer and apply theoretical knowledge in practice, address professional and work-related problems, find new sources of knowledge and use scientific methods. The programme is rounded off by elective content that enable students to develop their skills with regard to a specific topic or theme, expand their horizons or build professional competence.

General competences of graduates, gained at a study programme

- broad general knowledge and a broad general perspective as conditions for intercultural communication and mediation, - the ability to think analytically and synthetically, - the ability to critically evaluate own research achievements and those of others, - use of communication skills for tolerant and appropriate professional discourse, - the ability to apply the principles of autonomy and collaboration in own professional work, - the ability to collaborate constructively when working in a team and with other teams in virtual and physical environments, - the ability to plan and manage time, stress and workloads, - responsible use of social media and online resources for professional purposes, - the ability to work with the technical resources of a modern workplace, - readiness for autonomous learning and self-improvement.

Subject specific competences of graduates, gained on a study programme

Subject-specific competences (skills) ensure that students are qualified to carry out high-quality basic consulting and independent work, i.e. translation of their chosen language or languages, prepare them for further study, and motivate them for lifelong learning and self-improvement. Subject-specific competences are defined in individual syllabuses as transferable/key skills and other attributes. Students of the Translation Studies programme acquire the following subject-specific competences for Slovene and their chosen foreign language: - mastery of the orthographic norms and pronunciation rules of the selected foreign language and standard Slovene, - a proficient understanding of morphemic and morphosyntactic categories and knowledge of the syntactic-textual structure of the languages studied, - an understanding of word-formational, interlexemic and phraseological relationships in the selected foreign language and Slovene from the point of view of new theoretical approaches in linguistics, - knowledge of earlier and contemporary currents in the selected foreign literature and Slovene literature, - the ability to autonomously keep abreast of current linguistic and literary phenomena and place them in the context of knowledge already acquired with regard to the languages studied, - the ability to engage publicly in the promotion of a higher writing and reading culture, - knowledge of historical, cultural, media, educational, economic and other characteristics, - contrastive analysis of texts and phenomena on the basis of already acquired knowledge from the intercultural and cross-cultural points of view, - location and use of related texts, creation of glossaries and dictionaries, - use of electronic aids and reference materials, - translation of easy and medium-difficult texts on various subjects into Slovene and a basic ability to defend translation choices, - translation of less complex texts from Slovene into the selected foreign language and a basic ability to defend translation choices, - knowledge of the basics of simultaneous and consecutive interpreting and note-taking techniques, - consecutive, simultaneous and whispered interpreting of less complex texts, - knowledge of the fundamental principles and aims of the most important international organisations, - the ability to autonomously keep abreast of current world events and place international organisations into this context, - knowledge of the basic principles of professional ethics and a developed sense for aesthetic and ethical values in the discipline, - knowledge of normal professional practice, conditions for self-employment and professional associations, - knowledge of general business communication, - professional awareness and familiarity with the role of the intercultural and cross-cultural mediator.

Access requirements

The following may enrol in the study programme Translation Studies: a) anyone who has passed the general matura (school-leaving examination), b) anyone who completed any four-year secondary school programme before 1 June 1995.

Selection criteria in the event of limited enrolment

If a decision is taken to limit places on the study programme Translation Studies – Hungarian (two-subject pathway), applicants will be selected on the basis of: overall mark in the general matura or school-leaving exam 40% of points, overall marks in the third and fourth years 10% of points, marks in English in the third and fourth years 20% of points, marks in Slovene in the third and fourth years 10% of points, mark in Hungarian in the general matura or school-leaving exam 20 % of points.

Transfer criteria between study programmes

Transfers between study programmes are possible in accordance with Articles 2 and 3 of the Criteria for Transfers between Study Programmes (UL RS, Nos 95/10, 17/11 and 14/19). Applicants who meet conditions for enrolment in the proposed programme and the conditions for transfer between programmes will be informed what year they may enrol in and what missing course units they must complete if they wish to conclude their studies under the new programme. Transfers are possible between programmes: - which guarantee the acquisition of comparable competences on completion and - between which at least half the course units under the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) from the first programme relating to compulsory units of the second programme may be recognised under the criteria for recognising knowledge and skills acquired prior to enrolment in the programme.

Criteria for recognition of knowledge and skills, gained before the enrolment in the study programme

Under the Rules on the recognition of knowledge and skills in programmes of study at the University of Maribor (https://www.um.si/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Pravilnik-o-priznavanju-znanj-in-spretnosti-v-studijskih-programih-UM-st.-012-2019-2.pdf), knowledge, skills or competences acquired by a student through formal or non-formal learning before enrolling in the programme (“prior learning”) may be recognised in the education process. The fundamental criterion in the recognition process is the comparability of knowledge acquired elsewhere with the course units, skills and competences in the programme. Applications for the recognition of knowledge and skills acquired through various forms of formal and non-formal education before enrolling in the programme will be considered by the Faculty of Arts in accordance with regulations. The student submits an application for the recognition of knowledge and skills to the Academic Affairs Committee at the Faculty of Arts. Knowledge/skills can be recognised in full, recognised in part or not recognised. In cases where knowledge/skills are recognised in part, the student must sit a specific exam on content determined by the unit coordinator.

Criteria for completing the study

Students of the Translation Studies programme complete the programme when they have completed all course units prescribed by the programme in the two programmes or two pathways in which they are enrolled, corresponding to a total of at least 180 ECTS credits (90 ECTS credits from one programme and 90 ECTS credits from the other).