SLO | EN
PRD-v18

1

Academic bachelor's studies

1 (prva)

7 (7)

0028209

6/2

2024/25

lekt. dr. DORIS MLAKAR GRAČNER

GERMAN STUDIES

dipl. germ. (UN)
diplomirani germanist (UN)
diplomirana germanistka (UN)
B.A.
Bachelor of Arts

02 - Arts and humanities
0231 - Language acquisition

6 - Humanities

Text about acceptance

On the basis of Article 51 of the Law on higher education (Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, no. 119/06-UPB3) and the Measures for the accreditation of higher education institutions and study programmes (Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 101/04) the Senate for accreditation with the Council of Higher Education of the Republic of Slovenia at its 4th meeting on 16th November 2007, adopted or gave consent to the university BA single major study programme German Studies (Decree No. 2/75-2007 dated 20th November 2007).

Advancement criteria of a study programme

Requirements for progression through the German Studies programme – German studies pathway (single-subject pathway): In order to progress to the second year, students must complete at least 54 ECTS credits. In order to progress to the third year, students must complete all first-year course units and second-year course units prescribed by the programme totalling at least 54 ECTS credits.

Criteria for completing separate parts of a study programme

The programme does not contain conditions for completion of individual segments of the programme.

Study advancement options

The German Studies programme prepares students to continue their education in a second-cycle programme (e.g. the single- or two-subject non-teaching programme Intercultural German Studies or the two-subject teaching programme German as a Foreign Language or related programmes).

Employment possibilities

The first-cycle German Studies programme enables graduates to acquire specific specialist competences in the German language and the literature and culture of the German language area, as well as selected general competences that qualify them to pursue various activities in both economic and non-economic sectors, above all in areas of work that envisage active cooperation with a German-speaking environment. Employment opportunities for graduates of the German Studies programme are tied above all to a high level of foreign language competence (communication in German) and in-depth knowledge of the culture of the German language area, which enables employment in all areas of economic and non-economic activity or cooperation with the German language area. Graduates can do various jobs connected to knowledge of German and the literature and culture of the German language area. They are qualified to communicate correctly in German in a manner appropriate to the circumstances and, thus, to occupy professional positions in public and private cultural institutions (archives, museums, libraries, societies, associations), the media, publishing, advertising and tourism and to work as public relations representatives for contacts with German-speaking environments. They can work in education and training institutions as education planners and edit literary, professional and academic texts in German. Exact figures on employment in the economic and non-economic sectors are not available, partly because UM is still in the process of setting up a system for the regular and systematic monitoring of employability and partly because the German Studies programme does not provide qualifications for regulated occupational profiles. Also to be taken into account is the fact that on 12 April 2013 the Act amending the Labour Market Regulation Act (ZUTD-A) entered into force and did away with the obligation to report job vacancies to the Employment Service of Slovenia (ESS). In the case of employers who do not belong to the public sector and companies that are not majority-owned by the state, the publication of job vacancies is left to their discretion and they are not required to inform the ESS. As a result, the ESS no longer has information on all job vacancies in the country. Analyses of available data, e.g. on the EURES network, Occupational Barometer 2021, Slovenian Higher Education Registry and Analytical Information System (http://portal.evs.gov.si/vnos/) clearly show (1) the need for (foreign) language and intercultural competences for high-quality economic cooperation on an equal footing, (2) the need for education on German language and culture. It is evident that various employment opportunities are open to graduates of the German Studies programme both in the economic sector and in the and non-economic (education) sector, for which they can demonstrate a relevant set of knowledge and skills acquired during their studies. The ESS highlights another fact that speaks in favour of graduates of the German Studies programme: employers are increasingly frequently including knowledge of a foreign language among the requirements for candidates for job vacancies, where this is not only limited to knowledge of English. In the experience of the staff at the ESS regional office in Maribor, candidates who are proficient in German have, as a rule, a better chance of finding a job in the Slovenian–Austrian border region, with around 16,000 people commuting daily to Austria from Slovenia’s eastern cohesion region and employers in the region giving preference to candidates who demonstrate good knowledge of German and of the culture of the German language area; this is also confirmed by alumni of the programme, a relatively large number of whom have found employment in neighbouring Austria, but also in Germany and Switzerland. Given figures on the demand for subject teachers at primary schools and secondary schools in Slovenia (cf. projections in the Occupational Barometer 2021), which includes German teachers, who must also complete second-cycle studies in order to attain this occupational profile, we can conclude that adequate planning of a long-term staffing policy is essential. Since the German Studies programme represents an excellent starting point for teacher education as part of a second-cycle programme, the 40 places we are proposing (20 in each pathway) are also intended to pursue this objective. We should also emphasise that trends in international communication and cooperation and the principles of European language policy (mother tongue + two foreign languages) point to an improved position of German as a neighbouring language, which promises to contribute to better employment opportunities for graduates of the German Studies programme.

Other obligations

- Horizontal integration of content: Below are some examples of the horizontal integration of course units by semesters, with one example of the horizontal integration of a language unit and one example of the horizontal integration of a literature unit per semester. In the first semester, the core language unit Introduction to the Study of German is horizontally integrated with the other language units of this semester (Language Reference Materials, German Reading and Writing Skills). The literature units Introduction to the Study of German Literature and Interpretation of Literary Texts are likewise horizontally integrated. In the second semester, the unit German Language – Phonetics is horizontally integrated with the unit German Language – Morphology and the unit Computer-Aided Linguistic Material. The literature units Methods of Literary and Cultural History and Introduction to Genre Poetics are also integrated at the horizontal level. In the third semester, the language unit Languages in Contact: German and Slovene is partially horizontally integrated with the unit Practical Language Skills 3. As regards literature units, the units Literature and Culture 1 and Austrian Literature are horizontally integrated. In the fourth semester, the language units German Language – Word Formation and Lexicology, German Language – Linguistic Communication, and Language Acquisition are horizontally integrated. There is likewise a strong horizontal integration between Swiss Literature and Literature and Culture 2. In the fifth semester German Language – Syntax is integrated with Rhetorics of Discourse, Basics of Semantics, and Language and Society. Two literature units (Literature and Culture 3 and Literature and Media) likewise show horizontal integration of their content. In the sixth semester, the language unit German Language – Selected Topics shows a strong horizontal integration with all other language and linguistics units (German Language – Phraseology, Text Linguistics and Stylistics) taught in this semester. Interculturality in Literature and German–Slovene Literary Transfer are examples of two horizontally integrated literature units. - Vertical integration of content: The curriculum consists of compulsory units and elective units that are vertically integrated with each other. This structure offers students a degree of choice while at the same time ensuring, through the compulsory units, that the fundamental knowledge acquired includes a balance of language and literature. The compulsory language units in the first semester (Introduction to the Study of the German Language, German Reading and Writing Skills, Language Reference Materials, German Language Development 1, Practical Language Skills 1) are thematically linked to the compulsory language units in subsequent semesters (vertical integration). Students develop their linguistic competences and gain an insight into the basics of the study of language. The compulsory literature unit Introduction to the Study of German Literature includes content from German literary history and literary theory. As part of the unit Interpretation of Literary Texts, students test and develop their ability to interpret literary texts in German. In the second semester, the units Methods of Literary and Cultural History and Introduction to Genre Poetics give students the knowledge they need to address and analyse literary and cultural discourse in later semesters. Via the compulsory units German Language Development and Practical Language Skills, which are compulsory units in each semester and connect all the semesters in a vertical sense, students practise, perfect and enhance their language skills. In the third semester, the compulsory language unit (Languages in Contact: German and Slovene) opens up an important aspect of languages and cultures and facilitates understanding of linguistic phenomena in the present age. The compulsory literature unit (Literature and Culture 1) vertically integrates with compulsory and elective literary history units in individual semesters. In the fourth semester, the compulsory literature unit (Literature and Culture 2) vertically integrates with the other units in this field while at the same time introducing new content that students can further expand and build on in other units, in particular in the compulsory unit in this semester (Swiss Literature). German Language Development 2 and Practical Language Skills 4 develop and build on language content. This semester places particular emphasis on the compulsory language units German Language – Linguistic Communication, Language Acquisition, and German Language – Word Formation and Lexicology; the last of these relates vertically to the unit Basics of Semantics in the fifth semester. In the fifth semester, the compulsory language unit (German Language – Syntax) encompasses integrated syntactic content and forms vertical connections both with the compulsory language units from the first and second semesters and with the compulsory units in the sixth semester (Text Linguistics and Stylistics and German Language – Phraseology). The compulsory literature unit (Contemporary Literature – Textual Analysis) links vertically to the literature units from the previous semesters, the concept of which goes beyond the borders of the German language area. In the sixth semester, students take the proposed compulsory language units (German Language – Phraseology, Text Linguistics and Stylistics, German Language – Selected Topics, Practical Language Skills 6) and two literature units (Interculturality in Literature and German–Slovene Literary Transfer). These units integrate vertically with the language or literature units from previous semesters. The compulsory units in the final semester include the Bachelor’s Thesis. Students thus complete the programme having acquired fundamental knowledge of German and the literature of the German language area. Elective units include German Studies Placement, which integrates vertically with all the units of the programme, depending on the focus or field of activity of the institution where the student does the placement.

Assesment criteria

Criteria and methods for testing and assessing student outcomes are made publicly available and are implemented in accordance with the adopted learning programme, unit syllabuses and information on the unit. The assessment system is regulated in accordance with the Statutes of the University of Maribor and the Rules on testing and assessing knowledge at the University of Maribor. Both documents are available online at: https://www.um.si/o-univerzi/dokumentno-sredisce/. Learning outcomes are defined by syllabuses. These are made publicly available and are accessible to all. They can be found in the catalogue of post-Bologna Reform programmes and units (https://aips.um.si/PredmetiBP5/main.asp) and on the Faculty of Arts website (http://ff.um.si/studenti/studijski-programi/). The method of assessment and testing is defined in each syllabus. This means that, on the basis of the published syllabus content, students can compare or check the content and levels of knowledge associated with specific skills. Academic staff encourage continuous work and continuous testing of knowledge throughout the study process, in this way enabling students to maintain a constant overview of their own progress. Students are also verbally informed about assessment criteria and methods when they begin a unit. Following analyses of pedagogical work and evaluation of the programme, appropriate amendments are made to syllabuses. Verification of whether students are successfully meeting the requirements of the programme is done through the testing and assessment of knowledge, which is the basis on which students obtain marks and credits in individual units of the programme, allowing them to progress through the programme and move on to further studies. At the same time, it provides students with feedback on the level of knowledge they have attained. Exam results are entered in an electronic register called the Academic Information Subsystem (AIPS). Results are entered by the exam administrator, who has access to the details of the students entered for the exam. After entering the marks for an individual exam, the exam administrator submits a signed exam report to the Student Affairs Office. This report is kept permanently and represents an official record of the institution. Students are informed of exam results as soon as they are entered and confirmed by the exam administrator, via their personal AIPS account, which they access using a username and password. Students have the right to ask to see their marked exam papers within 30 days of publication of the results. Students’ knowledge is tested in examinations, colloquia and other forms of testing and assessment, and awarded a positive or negative mark. Positive marks are “excellent” (10), “very good” (9 and 8), “good” (7) and “satisfactory” (6). Negative marks are all marks from 1 to 5. Units may also be assessed as “passed”/“not passed” if the syllabus envisages this. The University of Maribor uses a uniform marking scale, which can be consulted online at: https://moja.um.si/student/Strani/Pravilniki-in-predpisi.aspx. Examination timetables are published in the publicly accessible calendar for each individual academic year (http://ff.um.si/studenti/urniki/). Lists of scheduled exam dates for individual units throughout the academic year are prepared by Departments and published by the Student Affairs Office in the AIPS by no later than 15 November for the current academic year.

Main study programme objectives

Primary aims: - graduates have basic and special knowledge of German and the literature and culture of the German language area, - graduates are able to apply this knowledge in practical work with German as a foreign language, - graduates demonstrate the in-depth knowledge and skills needed to find and use new sources of knowledge, develop and enhance communication skills and other professional competences necessary for field-specific and interdisciplinary professional work on a lifelong basis, and develop professional critical thinking and self-criticism, responsibility, initiative and independence in professional work and social activities, - graduates have the knowledge and skills needed for further study at higher levels of German Studies and related fields. These general aims are in line with the specific content objectives of individual syllabuses and are a starting point for assessing and measuring students’ learning outcomes. Forms and methods of assessment are defined in individual syllabuses, taking into account, mutatis mutandis, the provisions of the relevant legal instruments of the Faculty of Arts of the University of Maribor and of the University of Maribor.

General competences of graduates, gained at a study programme

General competences: The general competences acquired by students on the single-subject pathway include the following: - mastery of linguistic, social and intercultural skills for communication in a foreign language (German), - the ability to apply acquired knowledge in practice, - knowledge and understanding of the different areas of the system of German language, literature and culture and relevant connections between them, - the ability to express professional viewpoints appropriately in terms of content and language, - information and media literacy, - the ability to find, critically evaluate and use sources and literature, - the ability to autonomously expand and develop their own foreign language abilities, - the ability to pursue lifelong learning in the fields of German language and literature and interlingual communication, - the ability to undertake professional work autonomously and cooperatively, - a capacity for analytical and synthetic thinking and critical or self-critical judgement, - the ability to acquire knowledge independently, - the ability to use ICT in a functional manner, - knowledge of basic methods in linguistic and literary studies. Rationale: General competences are designed to allow graduates to demonstrate a broad range of abilities necessary to function in a professionally appropriate, effective, independent and collaborative manner in practical areas of work and further studies. Graduates develop a high level of proficiency in a foreign language (at least C1) and are able to use sources, literature and ICT appropriately and critically. General competences are the basis for the independent and lifelong acquisition of new knowledge (e.g. as part of specialisations).

Subject specific competences of graduates, gained on a study programme

Subject-specific competences: Subject-specific competences derive from the compulsory units that represent the essential framework of German Studies knowledge and elective units that cover special and/or in-depth German Studies knowledge. They derive from the linguistic, literary, literary theoretical and intercultural study of the German language area: - an understanding of the historical position of German language, literature and culture in the European context, with particular emphasis on the intersection between Slovene and German, - knowledge and understanding of the position of German in the family of Indo-European languages from the point of view of linguistic typology, - knowledge and understanding of the linguistic history of the German language area, - knowledge, understanding and mastery of the fundamental elements and principles of phonetics, morphology, word formation, syntax, text linguistics, lexicology and phraseology in the system of the modern German language, - proficient use of standard German in spoken and written texts, - knowledge of the characteristics of selected types of text and proficiency in using them appropriately in specific speech situations, - the ability to recognise different forms and varieties of German, - an understanding of the basic cognitive and communicative functions of language and processes of natural language acquisition, - the ability to use appropriate and effective linguistic behaviour in multilingual environments and situations, - proficiency in the use of basic software and electronic resources to study German, - proficient use of language reference works (grammars, dictionaries, corpora), - the ability to identify situations of language contact between German and Slovene and an understanding of the ways in which they occur, - knowledge of the basic concepts and principles of stylistics and their use in spoken and written communication, - mastery of the basics of rhetoric and dialogical communication; use of rhetorical skills to produce pragmatically appropriate texts and in effective speech performance, - functional mastery of the basic concepts of literary theory and literary historical studies and the ability to use them in the analysis and interpretation of literary and semi-literary texts, - the ability to identify, analyse and interpret cross-disciplinary literary and cultural connections, - an understanding of literary production and reception in aesthetic, social and cultural-historical contexts, - knowledge and understanding of the literary history of the German language area from the Middle Ages to the present day, - knowledge of the main distinguishing features of Austrian, German and Swiss literature, - an understanding of the role of the media in cultural and literary-historical processes, - an understanding of the reception of German literature in the Slovene environment and influences on Slovene literary production, - an understanding of the specific features of the literary work of women writers. Subject-specific competences are designed to comprehensively equip graduates with fundamental knowledge of German linguistics, literary theory and literary history, and enable them to work in a professionally appropriate, effective, independent and collaborative manner in practical areas that require a high level of foreign language proficiency (in German).

Access requirements

The following may enrol in the academic study programme German Studies: a) anyone who has passed the general matura (school-leaving examination), b) anyone who has passed the vocational matura in any secondary school programme and an examination in one general matura subject; the selected subject may not be a subject already taken by the applicant as part of the vocational matura, c) anyone who completed any four-year secondary school programme before 1 June 1995.

Selection criteria in the event of limited enrolment

If a decision is taken to limit places, applicants from points a) and c) will be selected on the basis of: overall mark in the vocational matura 40% of points, overall marks in the third and fourth years 20% of points, marks in German in the third and fourth years 20% of points, mark in German in the general matura 20% of points; applicants from point b) will be selected on the basis of: mark in the vocational matura 40% of points, overall marks in the third and fourth years 10% of points, marks in German in the third and fourth years 20% of points, mark in German in the vocational matura 20% of points, mark in one matura subject 10% of points.

Transfer criteria between study programmes

Transfers between study programmes are possible in accordance with Articles 2 and 3 of the Criteria for Transfers between Study Programmes, as amended. Applicants who meet conditions for enrolment in the proposed programme and the conditions for transfer between programmes will be informed what year they may enrol in and what missing course units they must complete if they wish to conclude their studies under the new programme. Transfers are possible between programmes: - which guarantee the acquisition of comparable competences on completion and - between which at least half the course units under the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) from the first programme relating to compulsory units of the second programme may be recognised under the criteria for recognising knowledge and skills acquired prior to enrolment in the programme.

Criteria for recognition of knowledge and skills, gained before the enrolment in the study programme

Under the Rules on the recognition of knowledge and skills in programmes of study at the University of Maribor (https://www.um.si/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Pravilnik-o-priznavanju-znanj-in-spretnosti-v-studijskih-programih-UM-st.-012-2019-2.pdf), knowledge, skills or competences acquired by a student through formal or non-formal learning before enrolling in the programme (“prior learning”) may be recognised in the education process. The fundamental criterion in the recognition process is the comparability of knowledge acquired elsewhere with the course units, skills and competences in the programme. Applications for the recognition of knowledge and skills acquired through various forms of formal and non-formal education before enrolling in the programme will be considered by the Faculty of Arts in accordance with regulations. The student submits an application for the recognition of knowledge and skills to the Academic Affairs Committee at the Faculty of Arts. Knowledge/skills can be recognised in full, recognised in part or not recognised. In cases where knowledge/skills are recognised in part, the student must sit a specific exam on content determined by the unit coordinator.

Criteria for completing the study

Students of the German Studies programme – German Studies pathway (single-subject pathway) complete the programme when they have completed all course units prescribed by the programme, corresponding to at least 180 ECTS credits.

GERMAN STUDIES

dipl. germ. (UN) in …
diplomirani germanist (UN) in …
diplomirana germanistka (UN) in …
B.A.
Bachelor of Arts

02 - Arts and humanities
0231 - Language acquisition

6 - Humanities

Text about acceptance

On the basis of Article 51 of the Law on higher education (Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 119/06-UPB3) and the Measures for the accreditation of higher education institutions and study programmes (Official Gazette of the Republic of Slovenia, No. 101/04) the Senate for accreditation with the Council of Higher Education of the Republic of Slovenia at its 4th meeting on 16th November 2007, adopted or gave consent to the university BA double major study programme German Language and Literature (Decree No. 2/75-2007 dated 20th November 2007).

Advancement criteria of a study programme

Requirements for progression through the German Studies programme – German studies pathway (two-subject pathway): In order to progress to the second year, students must complete at least 27 ECTS credits. In order to progress to the third year, students must complete all first-year course units and second-year course units prescribed by the programme totalling at least 27 ECTS credits.

Criteria for completing separate parts of a study programme

The programme does not contain conditions for completion of individual segments of the programme.

Study advancement options

The German Studies programme prepares students to continue their education in a second-cycle programme (e.g. the single- or two-subject non-teaching programme Intercultural German Studies or the two-subject teaching programme German as a Foreign Language or related programmes).

Employment possibilities

The first-cycle German Studies programme enables graduates to acquire specific specialist competences in the German language and the literature and culture of the German language area, as well as selected general competences that qualify them to pursue various activities in both economic and non-economic sectors, above all in areas of work that envisage active cooperation with a German-speaking environment. Employment opportunities for graduates of the German Studies programme are tied above all to a high level of foreign language competence (communication in German) and in-depth knowledge of the culture of the German language area, which enables employment in all areas of economic and non-economic activity or cooperation with the German language area. Graduates can do various jobs connected to knowledge of German and the literature and culture of the German language area. They are qualified to communicate correctly in German in a manner appropriate to the circumstances and, thus, to occupy professional positions in public and private cultural institutions (archives, museums, libraries, societies, associations), the media, publishing, advertising and tourism and to work as public relations representatives for contacts with German-speaking environments. They can work in education and training institutions as education planners and edit literary, professional and academic texts in German. Exact figures on employment in the economic and non-economic sectors are not available, partly because UM is still in the process of setting up a system for the regular and systematic monitoring of employability and partly because the German Studies programme does not provide qualifications for regulated occupational profiles. Also to be taken into account is the fact that on 12 April 2013 the Act amending the Labour Market Regulation Act (ZUTD-A) entered into force and did away with the obligation to report job vacancies to the Employment Service of Slovenia (ESS). In the case of employers who do not belong to the public sector and companies that are not majority-owned by the state, the publication of job vacancies is left to their discretion and they are not required to inform the ESS. As a result, the ESS no longer has information on all job vacancies in the country. Analyses of available data, e.g. on the EURES network, Occupational Barometer 2021, Slovenian Higher Education Registry and Analytical Information System (http://portal.evs.gov.si/vnos/) clearly show (1) the need for (foreign) language and intercultural competences for high-quality economic cooperation on an equal footing, (2) the need for education on German language and culture. It is evident that various employment opportunities are open to graduates of the German Studies programme both in the economic sector and in the and non-economic (education) sector, for which they can demonstrate a relevant set of knowledge and skills acquired during their studies. The ESS highlights another fact that speaks in favour of graduates of the German Studies programme: employers are increasingly frequently including knowledge of a foreign language among the requirements for candidates for job vacancies, where this is not only limited to knowledge of English. In the experience of the staff at the ESS regional office in Maribor, candidates who are proficient in German have, as a rule, a better chance of finding a job in the Slovenian–Austrian border region, with around 16,000 people commuting daily to Austria from Slovenia’s eastern cohesion region and employers in the region giving preference to candidates who demonstrate good knowledge of German and of the culture of the German language area; this is also confirmed by alumni of the programme, a relatively large number of whom have found employment in neighbouring Austria, but also in Germany and Switzerland. Given figures on the demand for subject teachers at primary schools and secondary schools in Slovenia (cf. projections in the Occupational Barometer 2021), which includes German teachers, who must also complete second-cycle studies in order to attain this occupational profile, we can conclude that adequate planning of a long-term staffing policy is essential. Since the German Studies programme represents an excellent starting point for teacher education as part of a second-cycle programme, the 40 places we are proposing (20 in each pathway) are also intended to pursue this objective. We should also emphasise that trends in international communication and cooperation and the principles of European language policy (mother tongue + two foreign languages) point to an improved position of German as a neighbouring language, which promises to contribute to better employment opportunities for graduates of the German Studies programme.

Other obligations

Below are some examples of horizontal integration by semesters: In the first semester, Introduction to the Study of the German Language is linked to Language Development 1. In the second semester, German Language – Phonetics is linked to German Language – Morphology. In the third semester, the compulsory unit Literature and Culture 1 is horizontally integrated with one of the elective units (e.g. Literature and Media, Austrian Literature). In the fourth semester, the language unit German Language – Word Formation is closely integrated with one of the elective units (German Language – Pragmalinguistics or Language Acquisition). Linguistic content in the fifth semester (German Language – Syntax, Basics of Semantics, and Language and Society) is horizontally integrated. The language units in the sixth semester (German Language – Phraseology and Text Linguistics and Stylistics) are horizontally integrated. The same applies to the literature units Interculturality in Literature and German–Slovene Literary Transfer. - Vertical integration of content: The curriculum of the two-subject pathway likewise consists of compulsory units and elective units that are vertically integrated with each other. The compulsory language units in the first semester (Introduction to the Study of the German Language and German Language Development 1) are thematically linked to the compulsory language units in subsequent semesters by which students deepen their linguistic competences and require a basis for further study of the language. The compulsory literature unit (Introduction to the Study of German Literature) includes content on German literary history and literary theory. This provides historical context and a theoretical basis for the German literature and literary history content of later semesters. The compulsory language units in the second semester (German Language – Phonetics and German Language – Morphology) are vertically integrated with the linguistic units in subsequent semesters (German Language – Word Formation, German Language – Syntax). The compulsory units German Language Development 1–4 explicitly vertically integrate the first four semesters and implicitly integrate all semesters, in that these units enable students to refine and develop their language skills throughout the course. The compulsory literature unit in the third semester (Literature and Culture 1) vertically integrates with compulsory and elective literary history units in individual semesters. In the fourth semester, the compulsory language unit (German Language – Word Formation and Lexicology) and German Language Development 4 focus more deeply on linguistic content and integrate vertically with the compulsory language units from previous semesters. Elective units in this semester include Placement, which integrates vertically with all the units of the programme, depending on the focus or field of activity of the institution where the student does the placement. In the fifth semester, students acquire and expand German language and literary studies content. The compulsory language units (German Language – Syntax, Basics of Semantics, and Language and Society) vertically build on and expand knowledge already acquired and link to the linguistic units of the sixth semester. The compulsory literature unit (Literature and Culture 3) links vertically to the literary studies units from previous semesters. In the sixth semester, students build their linguistic and literary studies competences via the compulsory language units (German Language – Phraseology, Text Linguistics and Stylistics) and compulsory literature units (German–Slovene Literary Transfer, Interculturality in Literature). Students thus complete the programme having acquired fundamental knowledge of German and the literature of the German language area.

Assesment criteria

Criteria and methods for testing and assessing student outcomes are made publicly available and are implemented in accordance with the adopted learning programme, unit syllabuses and information on the unit. The assessment system is regulated in accordance with the Statutes of the University of Maribor and the Rules on testing and assessing knowledge at the University of Maribor. Both documents are available online at: https://www.um.si/o-univerzi/dokumentno-sredisce/. Learning outcomes are defined by syllabuses. These are made publicly available and are accessible to all. They can be found in the catalogue of post-Bologna Reform programmes and units (https://aips.um.si/PredmetiBP5/main.asp) and on the Faculty of Arts website (http://ff.um.si/studenti/studijski-programi/). The method of assessment and testing is defined in each syllabus. This means that, on the basis of the published syllabus content, students can compare or check the content and levels of knowledge associated with specific skills. Academic staff encourage continuous work and continuous testing of knowledge throughout the study process, in this way enabling students to maintain a constant overview of their own progress. Students are also verbally informed about assessment criteria and methods when they begin a unit. Following analyses of pedagogical work and evaluation of the programme, appropriate amendments are made to syllabuses. Verification of whether students are successfully meeting the requirements of the programme is done through the testing and assessment of knowledge, which is the basis on which students obtain marks and credits in individual units of the programme, allowing them to progress through the programme and move on to further studies. At the same time, it provides students with feedback on the level of knowledge they have attained. Exam results are entered in an electronic register called the Academic Information Subsystem (AIPS). Results are entered by the exam administrator, who has access to the details of the students entered for the exam. After entering the marks for an individual exam, the exam administrator submits a signed exam report to the Student Affairs Office. This report is kept permanently and represents an official record of the institution. Students are informed of exam results as soon as they are entered and confirmed by the exam administrator, via their personal AIPS account, which they access using a username and password. Students have the right to ask to see their marked exam papers within 30 days of publication of the results. Students’ knowledge is tested in examinations, colloquia and other forms of testing and assessment, and awarded a positive or negative mark. Positive marks are “excellent” (10), “very good” (9 and 8), “good” (7) and “satisfactory” (6). Negative marks are all marks from 1 to 5. Units may also be assessed as “passed”/“not passed” if the syllabus envisages this. The University of Maribor uses a uniform marking scale, which can be consulted online at: https://moja.um.si/student/Strani/Pravilniki-in-predpisi.aspx. Examination timetables are published in the publicly accessible calendar for each individual academic year (http://ff.um.si/studenti/urniki/). Lists of scheduled exam dates for individual units throughout the academic year are prepared by Departments and published by the Student Affairs Office in the AIPS by no later than 15 November for the current academic year.

Main study programme objectives

Primary aims: - graduates have basic knowledge of German language and literature and the culture of the German language area, - graduates are able to apply this knowledge in practical work with German as a foreign language, - graduates demonstrate the knowledge and skills needed to find and use new sources of knowledge, develop and enhance communication skills and other professional competences necessary for field-specific and interdisciplinary professional work on a lifelong basis, and develop responsibility, initiative and independence in professional work and social activities, - graduates have the knowledge and skills needed for further study at higher levels of German Studies and related fields. These general aims are in line with the specific content objectives of individual syllabuses and are a starting point for assessing and measuring students’ learning outcomes. Forms and methods of assessment are defined in individual syllabuses, taking into account, mutatis mutandis, the provisions of the relevant legal instruments of the Faculty of Arts of the University of Maribor and of the University of Maribor.

General competences of graduates, gained at a study programme

General competences: The general competences acquired by students on the two-subject pathway include the following: - mastery of linguistic, social and intercultural skills for communication in a foreign language (German), - the ability to apply acquired knowledge in practice, - knowledge and understanding of the fundamental areas of the system of German language, literature and culture - the ability to express viewpoints appropriately in terms of content and language, - information and media literacy, - the ability to find, critically evaluate and use sources and literature, - the ability to autonomously expand and develop their own foreign language abilities, - the ability to pursue lifelong learning in the fields of German language and literature and interlingual communication, - the ability to collaborate professionally. Rationale: General competences are designed to allow graduates to demonstrate the core range of abilities necessary to function in a professionally appropriate, effective, independent and collaborative manner in practical areas of work and further studies. Graduates develop a high level of proficiency in a foreign language and are able to use sources, literature and ICT appropriately and critically. Students on the two-subject pathway acquire part of their general competences in their other chosen subject. General competences are the basis for the independent and lifelong acquisition of new knowledge (e.g. as part of specialisations).

Subject specific competences of graduates, gained on a study programme

Subject-specific competences: Subject-specific competences derive from the compulsory units that encompass fundamental German Studies knowledge and elective units that offer special and/or in-depth German Studies knowledge. They derive from the linguistic, literary, literary theoretical and intercultural study of the German language area: - mastery of the essential elements of the system of modern German - the ability to use a foreign language (German) effectively and flexibly - the ability to recognise different forms and varieties of German and the effect of non-linguistic factors on language use - knowledge and understanding of the linguistic history of the German language area - knowledge of and proficiency in the basic concepts and principles of stylistics - mastery of the basics of rhetoric, dialogical communication and strategies for creating pragmatically appropriate texts and effective speaking - familiarity with and proficient use of language reference works (grammars, dictionaries, corpora) - knowledge of the fundamental concepts of literary theory and analysis and the ability to apply them in the interpretation of texts - knowledge and understanding of the literary history of the German language area from the Middle Ages to the present day - the ability to identify situations of language contact and literary contacts between German and Slovene and an understanding of the ways in which they occur - the ability to critically evaluate and analyse literary texts - the ability to identify forms of interaction between culture and the media and other social systems - the ability to identify the reciprocal effects of literary production and reception and their embeddedness in broader social currents; Subject-specific competences derive from the programme as a whole, which through compulsory units provides fundamental knowledge of the major linguistic disciplines and an insight into the literature and culture of the German language area, while elective units provide graduates with additional special knowledge and skills tied to German language, literature and culture.

Access requirements

The following may enrol in the academic study programme German Studies: a) anyone who has passed the general matura (school-leaving examination), b) anyone who has passed the vocational matura in any secondary school programme and an examination in one general matura subject; the selected subject may not be a subject already taken by the applicant as part of the vocational matura, c) anyone who completed any four-year secondary school programme before 1 June 1995.

Selection criteria in the event of limited enrolment

If a decision is taken to limit places, applicants from points a) and c) will be selected on the basis of: overall mark in the vocational matura 40% of points, overall marks in the third and fourth years 20% of points, marks in German in the third and fourth years 20% of points, mark in German in the general matura 20% of points; applicants from point b) will be selected on the basis of: mark in the vocational matura 40% of points, overall marks in the third and fourth years 10% of points, marks in German in the third and fourth years 20% of points, mark in German in the vocational matura 20% of points, mark in one matura subject 10% of points. There is no connection possible between the German Studies two-subject pathway and any other language programme or pathway of the same language (Translation Studies – German).

Transfer criteria between study programmes

Transfers between study programmes are possible in accordance with Articles 2 and 3 of the Criteria for Transfers between Study Programmes, as amended. Applicants who meet conditions for enrolment in the proposed programme and the conditions for transfer between programmes will be informed what year they may enrol in and what missing course units they must complete if they wish to conclude their studies under the new programme. Transfers are possible between programmes: - which guarantee the acquisition of comparable competences on completion and - between which at least half the course units under the European Credit Transfer System (ECTS) from the first programme relating to compulsory units of the second programme may be recognised under the criteria for recognising knowledge and skills acquired prior to enrolment in the programme.

Criteria for recognition of knowledge and skills, gained before the enrolment in the study programme

Under the Rules on the recognition of knowledge and skills in programmes of study at the University of Maribor (https://www.um.si/wp-content/uploads/2021/11/Pravilnik-o-priznavanju-znanj-in-spretnosti-v-studijskih-programih-UM-st.-012-2019-2.pdf), knowledge, skills or competences acquired by a student through formal or non-formal learning before enrolling in the programme (“prior learning”) may be recognised in the education process. The fundamental criterion in the recognition process is the comparability of knowledge acquired elsewhere with the course units, skills and competences in the programme. Applications for the recognition of knowledge and skills acquired through various forms of formal and non-formal education before enrolling in the programme will be considered by the Faculty of Arts in accordance with regulations. The student submits an application for the recognition of knowledge and skills to the Academic Affairs Committee at the Faculty of Arts. Knowledge/skills can be recognised in full, recognised in part or not recognised. In cases where knowledge/skills are recognised in part, the student must sit a specific exam on content determined by the unit coordinator.

Criteria for completing the study

Students of the German Studies programme – German Studies pathway (two-subject pathway) complete the programme when they have completed all prescribed course units in the two programmes in which they are enrolled, corresponding to a total of at least 180 ECTS credits (90 ECTS credits from one programme and 90 ECTS credits from the other).